optical wont fit in dvd player

Discussion in 'Home Theater Projects' started by Joe Bates, Feb 21, 2004.

  1. Joe Bates

    Joe Bates Extra

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    hi, it wont fit in my dvd player so im using the crappy coaxial cable with it to connect upto my reciever (5.1/dts) is there an attatchment i can get, or is it not really worth it? i spent 20 £ and im just annoyed it wont fit, or is it worthwhile switching the optical for a co-axial?
    thanks guys, im so pleased with my new tv and setup [​IMG]
     
  2. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    There's a protective cover on the cable and there may be a protective insert in your player that needs to be removed.
     
  3. Joe Bates

    Joe Bates Extra

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    i have removed that but it wont fit
     
  4. JeffPhill

    JeffPhill Agent

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    You do have it turned the correct way, right? It will only go in one way.
     
  5. Joe Bates

    Joe Bates Extra

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    yeah i got it working now thanks guys, my cousin was setting it up so he didnt notice the right way [​IMG] to be honest i have a crappy coaxial and cant tell the difference between the good optical and crap coaxial.

    a quick question, how do i connect my tv to the reciever so i can use the speakers with my tv?
    thanks guys
     
  6. JeffPhill

    JeffPhill Agent

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    Your tv has to have rca type outputs, otherwise use your vcr (most have them).
     
  7. Justin_D

    Justin_D Stunt Coordinator

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    Joe:

    Most people tell little or no difference between these cables except in higher end audio or people with very picky ears. Usually both.

    Many people, including myself, think that this the placebo effect at work. Digital is digital. A $400 cable can't make ones and zeros better ones and zeros. This is different in analog cables because those aren't digital, therefore, there will be a loss. As long as the cable is able to transfer 100% of the data, which most reasonably priced (not talking Monster or even more expensive here) cables are able to achieve, there will be little you can do cable wise to make it sound better.

    This is just my opinion though.

    Also:

    If you have a cable box, have that go direct into your receiver instead of from your TV. My Comcast Digital cable box has Analog outs for both video and audio. Most boxes tend to do the same.
     
  8. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    As was stated above... how much better do you expect one cable to send '010001010011'?

    Im in the camp of 'bits are bits', a properly shielded coaxial cable (most composite video cables will do fine) thats capable of sending all the bits will sound THE SAME as an optical.

    I remember reading an article (or a thread here? i forget) where testers did a double-blind test using a high end digital coax interconnect, and one made of metal clothes hangers. The verdict? No discernable difference in sound.

    So no, UNLESS your system is very high end and you can shell out a couple hundred bucks for a single peice of wire :p), no its not worth 'upgrading' to optical.
     
  9. David WS

    David WS Stunt Coordinator

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    The only argument that I've ever heard the I even thought for a minute could affect digital signals in different cables had to do with the timing (or clock) of the signal. The writer indicated that a poorly constructed cable could interrupt the arrival time of the 1's and 0's at the processor. Something referred to a "jitter" (I think). It was an interesting article but I didn't buy it. I have a Computer Science degree so I'm of the 1's are 1's and 0's are 0's camp. Either it works or it doesn't.
     

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