Optical or component video or should I go direct

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Paul D Cook, Dec 19, 2002.

  1. Paul D Cook

    Paul D Cook Auditioning

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    Out with the old, in with the new. New (Used) Sony KP-53HS10 HDTV, Sony DVP-NS755V DVD player and Sony STR-DA1ES A/V Receiver. Replaces a 15 year old 45" Zenith and Yamaha equipment. DVD wasn't even on the market yet when that equipment was in it's prime. But to get to the question, the Sony receiver has Optical and Component video inputs for the DVD. But I've received suggestions to go directly from the DVD to the TV instead, via the component video jacks. To me, this defeats the switching capabilities of the receiver but what do I know? Is there a reason for this suggestion based on fact's like there is some double conversion going on in the receiver to induce noise etc? Or is it really O.K. to just hook everything up to the receiver as it was designed by Sony. I know that question is not as simple as it sounds so just hit me with the quick and dirty. Thanks and Happy Holidays to all.
    Paul
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  3. Paul D Cook

    Paul D Cook Auditioning

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    Ahhhhh! I made the assumption that the optical input was the digital connection for both the audio AND video. Thanks for the information. Yes, the set has multiple component video inputs but only one coaxial digital connection. That was the reason for planning on utilizing the A/V receiver with multiple components. But I'll use the optical input for digital audio right now (which may or may not be the best source) and run the component video straight to the TV. I'll play around with it for sure. Thanks M.
    PDC
     
  4. Herman S

    Herman S Agent

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    Try both. If you can't tell the difference from connecting straight to the TV or to the receiver, then I say go with the receiver. It is a lot more convenient.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  5. ChrisWiggles

    ChrisWiggles Producer

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    Also to add to Micheal's response, coax digital is ALSO for audio [​IMG] Digital optical and coax are both for audio. Composite, s-video, and component are for video. And analog RCA, just plain 'ol stereo jacks are for analog audio, or audio that has already been decoded and converted into analog. As for your use of the optical audio jack instead of the coax, it's really a coin flip. Optical has a "coolness factor." One of my friends uses optical everywhere he can just because "it's cool." Not the smartest reason. Anyway, there should be no difference between optical and coax, but coax is a lot cheaper. Optical's advantages are that is is not subject to any RF interference, BUT this really is only a good thing over very long, and noisy runs, which would be VERY expensive indeed with an optical cable, if you could even find such a cable to buy. That's why i recommend the coax, its cheaper, and accomplishes the same thing, and has better and sturdier connections(good 'ol RCA connectors). And as for using the receiver to switch the video, I would recommend going straight to the TV. Many receivers dont have video switching that has the bandwidth capabilites to handle component switching properly, BUT, if you have lots of things that you wanna use component on, or s-video or whatever, more than the jacks on your tv, you have to use the reciever, or be content with unpluggin/plugging in wires every time. Even if you have just a couple things to connect, and enough inputs on the tv, it can be more convenient to use the receiver. Rather than switching the video source once on the tv and also switching the audio on the reciever, you can just hit one button on the receiver and switch them both. This can be especially handy for technically challenged family/relatives. Heh... i dunno why my posts always end up so long, but there ya go [​IMG]
     

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