Operating Temperature

Discussion in 'Computers' started by SethH, Jan 26, 2005.

  1. SethH

    SethH Cinematographer

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    Ok, I've got a computer I built about 6 months back. It's a P4 3.0GHz with a couple of SATA HD's and a mediocre video card in an Antec Sonata case. I recently installed the United Devices cancer research software (see the thread in the After Hours lounge) and was excited to be able to help such a great cause. Well, I'm now a little concerned. When that program gets going and using 70%+ of my CPU, the temperature of my CPU goes up to about 140 F. Is this safe to have it run at this temp for extended periods of time? The motherboard cuts the CPU at 167F, but it still just seems a little high. The Sonata has a spot in the front of the case to add a 120mm fan to pull air into the case. How much of a difference would this make? Also, would RAM heatsinks help much? Replacing the CPU cooler isn't really an option right now, simply because I don't want to do it and risk screwing something up.
     
  2. Christ Reynolds

    Christ Reynolds Producer

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    CJ
    140F = 60C, and that isn't too bad. i once did a video project (for myself) that had my cpu at 100% for three weeks. i'm not sure about the temp at full load, i would guess it was about 55C or so. adding ram heatsinks would do next to nothing to help with the heat problem, the ram creates very little heat in comparison with the cpu. i'd add that 120mm fan, that would likely help out quite a bit, especially if you have an exhaust fan at the rear of the case, and no other intake fans.

    CJ
     
  3. DanielM

    DanielM Stunt Coordinator

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    p4,s throttle themselves if they get to warm so as to avoid thermal damage
     

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