Onkyo 696 - Help!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Joseph_M, Feb 24, 2002.

  1. Joseph_M

    Joseph_M Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2002
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    So after much research (about a month), including this forum, and one sound test comparing the 595 to the 696 to the Denon 1802, I finally bought the 696.

    HT sounds great (it is all new to me). But I'm concerned about straight stereo. Previous set up was a early 90's Pro Logic vintage Sony, 700 series, about 100/per (don't know the fequency range).

    My concern is I need to crank up the 696 to about 50-55 (out of 75) (67+%) to get the same volume I got from the Sony at about 50%. I do know we are talking apples and oranges, e.g., the Sony starts distorting at about 75%, where as the Onkyo does not when turned up. But I'm still concerned that I need to crank it so much to get a good high volume.

    Is this characteristic typical of better built receivers (e.g. Onkyo, Denon)? Or is this a problem with my specific unit?
     
  2. Ferdinand T

    Ferdinand T Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2001
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just bought a Onkyo TX-DS797 and mine can go past 75. As far as turning it up to 50-55 to hear the sound it is not your receiver. It's just the way Onkyo's are it's all about quality sound at any volume. Something my Sony could not do.
     
  3. StephenL

    StephenL Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2000
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
    It is a characteristic typical of better receivers: more usable range of adjustment. Some receivers also give you the choice of absolute or relative volume display. I prefer the relative volume display on my Onkyo TX-DS898. The reference level is displayed as 0 dB (equal to an absolute volume of 82). Levels below reference are displayed as negative numbers.
     
  4. Ferdinand T

    Ferdinand T Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2001
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    What is the difference between absolute and relative volumes? I just got my receiver 2 days ago so I'm still learning.
     
  5. Kyle_Y

    Kyle_Y Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2001
    Messages:
    238
    Likes Received:
    0
    Absolute Volume is from 1-100 while relative is from -infinity to about 18 or 20 I think on Onkyos, I have my 797 set to absolute display. Onkyo use Optimum Gain Volume Circuitry and a logorithmic style of increasing the volume of sound, so yes, to get loud sound, you iwll have to turn it to say 50%, but it will play clear and undistored up till 90-95%. Your Sony would have crapped out at 70-75% if it was lucky.
     
  6. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2001
    Messages:
    17,989
    Likes Received:
    1,545
    Location:
    One Loudoun, Ashburn, VA
    Real Name:
    David Fischer
    Saying the same thing differently... [​IMG]
    The low-volume range is "stretched" out over a large amount of the receiver control range, and the louder volumes are "squished" into a shorter control range.
    It's kinda like the volume control does this:
    00-70% Volume Knob => 0-25% perceived volume
    71-100% Volume Knob => 26%-100% Volume
    In the lower volume-control range, the output volume increases slowly. The output volume then increases much more rapidly
    For my uses, this is wonderful. I have much better control over the softer volumes, which is important living in an apartment. But it felt odd for a while, until I adjusted [​IMG]
     
  7. Joseph_M

    Joseph_M Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2002
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks all for the feebback. Still learning. I was curious about Ferdinand's comments about his 797 - that it goes higher then 75. Same specs, but it is THX certified. Are the amps better?
     
  8. Randy Schissler

    Randy Schissler Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2002
    Messages:
    53
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joeseph,

    I have the 797. I haven't listened to the 696, but although the 696 and 797 are both rated at 100wpc, if you look at the specs, the 797 has more power.

    --Randy S.
     

Share This Page