Onkyo 595 connecting to the HSU VTF-2 subwoofer?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Steven Spargo, Jul 26, 2001.

  1. Steven Spargo

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    I know someone out there has this set up so lend hand , please.
    Single cable from the 595 must go to Y- adapter which then fits into the VTF - 2. Sounds simple.
    It then says, "if the subwoofer out is low pass filtered, set the crossover to "out" .. What does this mean?
    "...the bass in the crossover region may be smother if you reverse the phase of the subwoofer relative to the main speakers" What is this all about
    Finally , the is a 0 - 180 switch on the back. What does this do?
    I may have gotten in over my head. At least the manuals for the Sony DVP 670D and Onkyo 595, while big and complcated, they do explain most things to me(so far). The guys who sent the info on the suwoofer need to write a better manual or give a better explanation of what, why and, how!!
    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. Thomas_Berg

    Thomas_Berg Screenwriter

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    i'm gonna bump this back into circulation b/c i'm about to be in the same boat. have a 595 and about to have a VTF-2. can someone please clarify?
     
  3. Joe_Papeo

    Joe_Papeo Stunt Coordinator

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    I dont have an Onkyo (I do have the HSU), but i am going to take a stab and at least one of these questions...
    "Finally , the is a 0 - 180 switch on the back. What does this do?"
    This is the subs crossover. There should be 2 places where you can set the crossover for your bass, one on the sub, and one on the receiver.
    You want to bypass the crossover on the sub and use the crossover on the receiver. To do this, set the "0-180 switch" on the back of the sub, to 180. This will allow the receiver to handle the crossover.
    On your receiver, configure your crossover to the proper seting (which you can only do on your own).
    This is how I set-up my Yamaha receiver and my VTF-2. Since there are 2 crossover settings, you do not want to "confuse" who controls the bass. If you try and configure both, you may have a hole in your bass outputfrom your sub.
    ------------------
    I'm Over Here Now
     
  4. Jeremy Anderson

    Jeremy Anderson Screenwriter

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    Actually, Joe... that "0-180" switch has NOTHING to do with the crossover. Allow me to explain:
    quote: It then says, "if the subwoofer out is low pass filtered, set the crossover to "out" .. What does this mean?[/quote]Here's the tech to English translation: If you're using the crossover on your receiver, set the subwoofer so that it is not also using a crossover. Depending on the sub, you can do this by either turning the sub's crossover knob as high as it will go or your sub may have a specific input for bypassing the crossover.
    quote: "...the bass in the crossover region may be smother if you reverse the phase of the subwoofer relative to the main speakers" What is this all about[/quote]A simple explanation of PHASE is this: 0 degrees phase means your sub is pushing out at the same time as your other speakers. 180 degrees reverses the polarity, meaning your sub is pulling in when your others push out. This is what the "0-180" switch is for. For the majority of subwoofer placement, you want to leave that switch at 0 degrees. However, certain positions in the room may reflect/absorb the sound in a way that throws it out of phase with the rest of the speakers, making bass sound overly boomy.
    So you need to turn the sub's crossover all the way up (which is most likely what they mean by OUT on the HSU) and set the phase to 0 degrees. Then put on something that has a wide range of bass frequencies and listen from your listening position. Then switch it to 180 degrees and play the same thing. One of the two positions will have a perceptable dropoff in upper bass energy, and you'll know not to use it. It helps to have someone around to flip the switch while you're listening.
    You can also check phase with a calibration disc such as Avia or Video Essentials, both of which have bass tones which will easily indicate phase problems in your room.
     

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