On my new kenwood vr-507 receiver. in DTS mode, it shows the subwoofer as LFE.?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by todd stone, Dec 10, 2001.

  1. todd stone

    todd stone Screenwriter

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    It normally in non dts modes shows SW, but what does LFE mean in it's place?

    Also, how come in DTS mode, the subwoofer doesnt seem to overpower as much as in pro logic II mode? It seems more rounded out and I have to raise the volume a bit more to hear the movie..
     
  2. John Garcia

    John Garcia Executive Producer

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    Usually, it helps if you mention the model/specs of the equipment you are using...

    SW: Subwoofer

    LFE: Low Frequency Effects - only present in multi-channel recordigns (DD, DTS, etc...)

    I have never had an instance where pro-logic had better bass than DTS, in fact DTS typically has the strongest bass on all of my DTS DVDs. When you are listening to pro-logic, is it from an analog source or a digital source? If it is analog, you could have bass settings or a bass boost that happens on PL material that may not be present for digital sources. DTS on my receiver has a LFE adjustment, maybe yours does also?

    Have you calibrated your system for reference level using an SPL and Avia or VE?
     
  3. todd stone

    todd stone Screenwriter

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    I used avia on my old reciever, I haven't yet on new one. just got it last night. I will tho.
     
  4. Mike LS

    Mike LS Supporting Actor

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    In DTS and Dolby Digital the sub is called the LFE (low frequency effects) channel. I guess somebody just made a decision to not call it the sub channel. It's all the same, and if your reciever shows the LFE icon on the readout, then it means your sub is connected and getting the signal it needs to do it's job.

    As far as the signal difference.....you'll notice that using different formats. Dolby Digital and DTS are basically the same. It might vary from movie to movie, but the levels are going to be pretty much the same in any digital format.

    But move from digital to analog and there's a world of difference. You'll always find that the analog signal seems stronger, so you'll have to lower your volume going form digital to analog. One thing to be careful of....if you go to the trouble of getting a calibration disc and SPL meter (if you haven't already) and doing a proper calibration of your setup, you'll find that (on a Kenwood) your "reference" level will usually be somewhere in the -20's. If you listen to a movie at reference (or close) and then go to an analog input, be SURE to lower your volume first, or you could do some real damage. I've found that comfortable listening levels in stereo or DPL are in the -40 something range. There's a big difference there.
     
  5. todd stone

    todd stone Screenwriter

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    Thanks Mikels, that's the info I was looking for. I THOUGHT there was a volume difference from analog to dts... [​IMG]
     

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