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Stephen PI

Supporting Actor
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Jan 31, 2003
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897
I recall when I first went to work at Pinewood Studios as a dubbing projectionist in August, 1968, a lot of discussion was going on in the sound department about a record amount of sound effects tracks (in the 30's) for the WHO WILL BUY? sequence in OLIVER! Thirty-plus sound effects tracks for a sequence was considered very high when you consider that doesn't include dial and vocals and orchestral tracks. Despite remarks about the OLIVER! soundtrack on this thread, Shepperton Studios sound department had a great reputation for high quality mixes winning numerous awards over the years. They were also one of the first studios in England to create stereo mixes (1955). Plus MGM British around the same time.
 

PMF

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Philip
I recall when I first went to work at Pinewood Studios as a dubbing projectionist in August, 1968, a lot of discussion was going on in the sound department about a record amount of sound effects tracks (in the 30's) for the WHO WILL BUY? sequence in OLIVER! Thirty-plus sound effects tracks for a sequence was considered very high when you consider that doesn't include dial and vocals and orchestral tracks. Despite remarks about the OLIVER! soundtrack on this thread, Shepperton Studios sound department had a great reputation for high quality mixes winning numerous awards over the years. They were also one of the first studios in England to create stereo mixes (1955). Plus MGM British around the same time.
What a coup it would be if the stems for “Oliver!” were ever to be found; that is, unless, it’s a known fact that they are forever gone.

Again, I say, the sound design was entirely worthy of its Oscar win.
 
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Stephen PI

Supporting Actor
Joined
Jan 31, 2003
Messages
897
As good as Shepperton's music stage 'L' s music and vocal acoustics were, this and most of the other music recording venues were hard pressed to compete with the Samuel Goldwyn Studios' stage #7 whose superior acoustics served conductor Johnny Green well on WEST-SIDE STORY. Much has been written about this legendary stage, including myself, it was the favorite venue of most of the film composers. Unlike other studios it was mostly a rental stage. In the thirties composer Alfred Newman, mixer Vinton Vernon and sound engineer Fred Wilson collaborated on forming stage #7 into the superior music venue. When Newman moved over to the newly-formed 20th Century-Fox Studio, Newman made every effort to emulate the acoustics on music stage #1.
Stage #7 were responsible for such music scores such as SPARTACUS, MY FAIR LADY, THE HALLELUJAH TRAIL, THE BIG COUNTRY, THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN, THE GREAT ESCAPE and most of the sixties Mirisch Films and many others. The stage ceased as a music stage in 1974 with 1776 and the Frank Sinatra album OLE' BLUE EYES IS BACK.
 

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