Old Turntable+New Reciever = Awful Sound

JoshA

Auditioning
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Messages
2
Here's the situation. I am trying to connect a JVC L-E600 from the mid-eighties to a fairly new Sony STR-DE675. I have tried to connect through several inputs, including AUX, CD, VIDEO1, and even went as far as patching it through my TV. The problem is I have to max out the volume on the reciever to get a "medium" sound level, and even at that it is only twitchy highs and absolutely no bass. I was wondering if the problems lies in the fact the reciever doesn't have a PHONO input. I don't know if that would make a difference. Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

Chuck Kent

Supporting Actor
Joined
May 29, 1999
Messages
983
Josh: You've hit the nail on the head. The JVC's phono cartridge puts out a very small amount of voltage and needs a special equalization curve to make it sound right. None of your receiver's inputs can provide a proper match for either need.

There are several phono pre-amplifiers out there. Decent ones can be found around a hundred bucks or so. Really inexpensive ones can be bought thru Crutchfield ot Radio Shack for under $40. Once you have one, just plug the JVC into it and the phono pre-amp into one of the Aux inputs...
 

greg_t

Screenwriter
Joined
Jan 18, 2001
Messages
1,653
Chuck is right. If you are not using a dedicated Phono input, you must use a preamp.
 

JoshA

Auditioning
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Messages
2
I figured I needed a preamp but was hoping there was another solution. Was just trying to be economical. Thanks for the prompt answer. I was hoping not to spend any money, because I just wanted to use the turntable to listen my parents 200+ classic rock albums. Will the more economical models differ that greatly from the higher priced models. I don't consider myself a complete audiophile, but I have a decent ear.
 

Danny Tse

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2000
Messages
3,185
The Radio Shack phono pre-amp (the so-call "Little Rat") is said to be as good as phono pre-amps that retails for $150.00. Run a search on "little Rat" at the [Vinyl] section of audioasylum.com or the source component section of HTF.
 

Ronn.W

Second Unit
Joined
Dec 16, 2002
Messages
333
Another option is to ditch the turntable and get a new turntable with a preamp built in. Sony makes a couple ranging in price from $99 to $150. Not necessarily high end equipment, but they do a good job and it would be a cheaper upgrade than buying a new receiver with phono inputs.
 

Marvin

Screenwriter
Joined
Apr 9, 1999
Messages
1,502
Real Name
Marvin
The Radio Shack phono pre-amp (the so-call "Little Rat") is said to be as good as phono pre-amps that retails for $150.00.
Interesting. My receiver (Denon 2700) has a phono input but I wonder if the Radio Shack pre-amp would be an upgrade. For LP listening, I set the volume to about -20, give or take 2; whereas for CD's it's in the -29 to -35 range. (For some reason, when I switched to a supposedly better stylus for my Audio-Technica cartridge, the volume went down a few dB's.

By any chance, has anyone ever compared the RS pre-amp to the one in my, or any, Denon receiver?
 

Danny Tse

Senior HTF Member
Joined
Nov 1, 2000
Messages
3,185
Marvin,

You can go to the Vinyl section of audioasylum.com, and do a search on "the little rat". You will be surprised at the amount of info there.
 

Marvin

Screenwriter
Joined
Apr 9, 1999
Messages
1,502
Real Name
Marvin
Danny,
Thanks. Actually, I checked it out and the response is generally favorable but I didn't find any comparisons to the pre-amp in the Denon.
It occurred to me that I may not be able to use the RS pre-amp anyway since all of receiver's inputs are in use and I'd have to plug it into my phono input, i.e. the signal would get boosted twice. I don't know if that's a good idea. Or is it?
 

Forum Sponsors

Forum statistics

Threads
345,198
Messages
4,733,823
Members
141,405
Latest member
vikesfan1963