Old Sony CD Player

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by KwongC, Oct 15, 2002.

  1. KwongC

    KwongC Agent

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    Hi, I have a really old Sony 5-disc Carousel CD player. It is about 14-15 years old. It came as part of a rack system. Anyway, it has a remote, but for some reason, the remote doesn't work on the unit anymore. I know that the remote is not broken because it works on another one of our Sony 5 disc carousel players (a much newer model). The Cd player is questions was repaired once for disc skipping, so maybe that had something to do with it. But I am just wondering how to get the Cd player to work with the remote again.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Jerome Grate

    Jerome Grate Cinematographer

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    I have a Sony 5 disc Carosel as well, at first I was going to bring it in the office to use after replacing it with an update Kenwood with optical and coaxial outputs. I noticed a lot of problems like skipping, carosel kept turning on some points with out stopping. Anyway maybe your just better off replacing the whole thing.
     
  3. KwongC

    KwongC Agent

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    yeah, I got this as a hand me down from my folks. I wanted to avoid getting a new one, but, maybe you're right, this one is just plain "old".

    My reason for having a CD player leads into another topic. That is, is it better to have a separate player for your CD's as opposed to having your DVD player do all the work? My DVD player plays everything from DVD's to CD's, but I just get the feeling that its not good to use your DVD player for everything, especially since i listen to music a lot. I don't know if this is an accurate assumption.
     
  4. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    Kwong, given the age of your CD player, I would replace it with a dedicated CD player. Just use your DVD player with DVDs. I prefer using a dedicated CD player for music for two reasons. For one thing, CD players usually sound better with CDs than comparably priced DVD players. Secondly, if you listen to CDs frequently, you will put a lot of wear and tear on your DVD player, which could accelerate its demise.
     
  5. KwongC

    KwongC Agent

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    if I do get a new, dedicated CD player, are there ones with optical outputs to connect to my receiver. Right now, I play music CD's through my DVD player, which I connect to my receiver via optical cable. This allows me to get dolbt digital, DTS, etc. My music CD's, of course, don't have this encoding, it is for my DVD's. So does it make a diff whether your CD player is connected via optical or just regular RCA jacks?
     
  6. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    Kwong, many CD players today have optical digital outputs. Some have coaxial digital outputs instead, while others have both. The sound quality can differ between the analog (RCA) outputs and digital output, so if you get a new player, try both. When you are using the analog outputs, you are using the player's DAC, but when you are using the digital output, you are using your receiver's DAC. Since DACs and other parts vary in quality, the sound can be better one way or the other.

    Does your receiver have an analog bypass mode? If so, engage it when trying a CD player's analog outputs. Without the analog bypass mode engaged, the analog signals will be routed through the receiver A/D and D/A converters, which will lead to loss of fidelity.
     
  7. KwongC

    KwongC Agent

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    whoa...looks like I need a lesson D/A, A/D science or something because I have very little clue on anything you just said!
     
  8. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    Kwong, as you probably know, the CD is a digital format. What is stored on a CD is not really music, it is data. The data is encoded as a series of 1s and 0s. The laser in a CD player reads the CD by, in layman's terms, reflecting the 1s and 0s (digital data) off the CD and processing the data through a digital-to-analog converter, or DAC, or D/A converter, which as the name indicates, converts the digital information to analog sound waves (two channels). These sound waves are then carried out of the player's RCA outputs to your receiver.

    For some reason, receivers by default will take those analog signals coming from your CD player and will convert them back to digital using an analog-to-digital converter, or ADC, or A/D converter. This recreated digital information must be converted to analog again to produce music, so the information goes from the ADC to the receiver's DAC. These extra conversions can lead to degradation, which impacts what you hear. On a good system (i.e., one where you hear "everything"), this degradation can be dramatic. To combat this problem, many newer receivers have an analog bypass mode, which prevents the analog signals coming from a CD player, cassette deck, etc. from being routed through the receiver's A/D and D/A converters. If you have components connected with analog cables into the receiver's stereo analog inputs, definitely engage the analog bypass mode if your receiver has one. Note that nearly all receivers use analog bypass on the 5.1-channel inputs by default.

    One final thing to note is that analog bypass is only an issue with surround-sound receivers and pre/pros, as these components have DSPs or digital signal processors. The DSP section has the A/D and D/A converters and the Dolby Digital and DTS decoders. Stereo amps do not have DSPs, so they have no analog bypass mode.

    I hope this helps.
     
  9. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    hey keith -
    would you say that a "source direct" type feature is the same or different than analog bypass?
    sorry to threadjack kwong, but i have to chase keith down when i can! [​IMG]
     
  10. KwongC

    KwongC Agent

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    thanks for the explanation Keith. So, if I have a DVD player connected via optical, I don't need to use the analog bypass mode, right?

    To be exact, I am currently using a Denon 2802 receiver and a Panasonic Prog. Scan Dvd player, connected via optical. I currently just leave the receiver on "Auto Detect" for decoding the disc (whether its DTS, Dolby Digital, etc.).

    Is there anything I need to do to this set up based on your explanation above?

    thanks!
     
  11. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    Ted,

    I believe that "Source Direct" is one manufacturer's name for analog bypass. I use analog bypass as a generic name for this feature. Sony calls it "Analog Direct".


    Kwong,

    You are correct in that you do not need to bother with the analog bypass mode on your '2802 when you are using an optical digital input. The analog bypass mode is only engaged when you are using a pair of analog inputs, such as the CD analog inputs.

    It looks like you are good to go. I have my DVD player connected to a Sony STR-V444ES receiver via a coaxial digital cable, and I have the DVD digital input set to "Auto Format Decode", which is the same your "Auto Detect".
     
  12. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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    thx keith.

    i've seen several iterations of this (source direct, pure direct, bypass, straight something or other...blah blah blah). i've always considered those tone control bypasses, but wasn't really sure if they're "true" analog bypass as well.

    hmm...if i ever get enough money to buy a new receiver i'll have to do some diggin'

    i now return you to your regularly scheduled thread...
     
  13. KeithH

    KeithH Lead Actor

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    Ted, I believe all the major companies are offering true analog bypass on most, if not all, of their receivers.
     
  14. Grant B

    Grant B Producer

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    KwongC
    My sony preamp has an auto detect also; but when I select optical and PCM decoding (for cds) I notice a subtle improvement in sound.

    You might want to check the difference between the 2 and see if it sounds better
     

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