Ok, i am still confused about Bipolar / Dipoles surround placement.

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Mohamed_M, Apr 20, 2004.

  1. Mohamed_M

    Mohamed_M Agent

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    I have just purchased the Fluance AV-BP2 and confused on speaker placement. According to my previous knowledge and the threads ive read here, The speaker position should be such that your head falls between the two drivers, i.e. in the null area. When i spoke to the rep on the phone, he said i should have one driver pointing towards me directly and the other pointing at the rear wall where the waves can bounce and radiate back at me. If this is true, this would indicate that the two drivers should have some phase delay so that the sound will reach me at the same time. Looking on the website, there is nothing that says the individual drivers run out of phase. So what am i supposed to do ? Also are dipoles/bipoles the same thing ? again if i understand correctly, i thought they were not. i understood that dipoles incorporate the out of phase thing and thus would agree with the rep's suggestion. I am lost![​IMG]
     
  2. Chris Tsutsui

    Chris Tsutsui Screenwriter

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    I think the purpose of having dipoles is to have the sound reach your ears at different times. Thus, they won't have any phase delay built into the design.

    The goal is to hear a combination of direct and reflected sound which will de-localize the sound effects and help create ambience to surround you.

    If your head is between the two surrounds, it's not in the null as long as the surrounds are wired in-phase. Maybe try two positions... One with the surrounds to the left and right of your head. Then try placing the surrounds in relationship to the rear wall so that sound will reflect off the back wall and hit the listening position.
     
  3. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    Looks like a bipolar speaker? Bipolar speakers do not have nulls. (Kind of a figure 8 with *lower* output at the sides, but no nulls.) They are designed to face you, and then the opposite drivers bounce sound off the walls to reinforce the direct sound you hear.

    Bipoles are wired in phase. The sound from both sets of drivers does not get to you in perfect phase anyway. (This doesn't happen with a dipole speaker either btw.) But because of the Haas effect, your brain compensates. The back drivers simply fill the room with more sound.

    If you can, try it both ways and see what you think. Some advice though, if the speakers are at ear level, you might prefer the "null" approach, but if they are the recommended 2 - 3 ft above your ears, then the direct approach *should* work better.
     
  4. Mohamed_M

    Mohamed_M Agent

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  5. Kevin C Brown

    Kevin C Brown Producer

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    OK cool. How far are the speakers from those side walls? Bipolars work best when they have some room behind them to "breathe". [​IMG]

    You also could try a "hybrid" approach, angling them at 45 deg. Point both faces at the midpoint of the back wall.

    Man, you're just going to have to experiment some! [​IMG]
     

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