1. Chu Gai

    Chu Gai Lead Actor

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    1) should be no problem

    2) no problem unless your receiver clips then you'll be sending distortion over to the speaker. It won't sound pretty at all.

    3) no way of telling. it really depends on your listening tastes, the size of your room, the program material, the efficiency of the speakers.

    Try it. Big amps with low distortion let you play louder cleaner.
     
  2. BrianWoerndle

    BrianWoerndle Supporting Actor

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    Ohms is a measure of resistance. The less resistance, the more current can flow. So your 6 ohm speakers will actually pull more than the 75 watts states at 8 ohms. Don't forget that wattage and ohms vary continously, so it is not an issue most of the time. So your bigger worries are if the transformer can supply the power to the amps, and overheating. You should be fine, just keep an eye out at high levels.
     
  3. JamesFarina

    JamesFarina Agent

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    The less resistance, the more current can flow. So your 6 ohm speakers will actually pull more than the 75 watts states at 8 ohms.

    Ohm's Law states Power = Voltage^2/resistance.
    So lets assume you had 8 ohm speakers and your receiver is 75 watts on the output. With a little algebra we find that your receiver puts out 24.5 volts. Now take the 24.5 volts and put that into the formula but divide by 6 ohms instead of 8. This gives you 100 watts into 6 ohms. Also the impedance curve for your loudspeaker needs to be considered, which shouldn't go below 6 ohms ever. I would say you are safe to use this setup, but I wouldn't run continuous sine waves for extended periods of time.

    Jim F
     
  4. JamesFarina

    JamesFarina Agent

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    The less resistance, the more current can flow. So your 6 ohm speakers will actually pull more than the 75 watts states at 8 ohms.

    Ohm's Law states Power = Voltage^2/resistance.
    So lets assume you had 8 ohm speakers and your receiver is 75 watts on the output. With a little algebra we find that your receiver puts out 24.5 volts. Now take the 24.5 volts and put that into the formula but divide by 6 ohms instead of 8. This gives you 100 watts into 6 ohms. Also the impedance curve for your loudspeaker needs to be considered, which shouldn't go below 6 ohms ever. I would say you are safe to use this setup, but I wouldn't run continuous sine waves for extended periods of time.

    Jim F
     
  5. Gordon Groff

    Gordon Groff Second Unit

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    Hi [email protected]!
    I agree that you will probably have no problem driving those speakers. But.... (always one of them!) I have found VAST differences in speaker's performance related to how you power them. If you are talking about a power-hungry speaker (which I suspect from it's 6ohm rating), you may very well find the sound improving greatly - and I mean a major step change - if you send it lots of clean power.

    If your receiver has pre-outs, it would be relatively inexpensive to pick up a decent used 2channel power amp and find out.

    Gordon
     

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