*** Official Thread - Robert Harris - Home Theater: Part Two - An Archaeology

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Bill Hunt, Jun 12, 2002.

  1. Bill Hunt

    Bill Hunt Insider
    Insider

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 1998
    Messages:
    434
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Hi Guys,
    To make it easier to follow Robert Harris' column at The Digital Bits, I'm going to start a new discussion thread here at HTF for each new part as he completes them. Just FYI. Here's the link to Robert's latest addition:
    Home Theater: An Archaeology - Part Two by Robert Harris
    Enjoy!
     
  2. David Lambert

    David Lambert Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2001
    Messages:
    11,380
    Likes Received:
    38
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Perhaps a mod can move appropriate discussion from the old thread into this one.

    Also, Mr. Harris has started another thread with corrections to the column; perhpas it should be merged here as well?

    Just some suggestions. I loved part 2, and cannot wait for more!
     
  3. Patrick McCart

    Patrick McCart Lead Actor

    Joined:
    May 16, 2001
    Messages:
    7,596
    Likes Received:
    257
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Location:
    Georgia (the state)
    Real Name:
    Patrick McCart
    There is NOTHING like seeing a film in the full Technicolor glory.

    If Mr. Harris is reading this, what are your opinions on the 1943 Phantom of the Opera DVD? The DVD looks like a good Technicolor process print transfer, but I really don't have a good idea of what Technicolor should look like (I'm not going to use Gone With The Wind as a point of referance...)
     
  4. Jianping

    Jianping Extra

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2002
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mr Harris, what's your opinions on the digital restoration. The 2001 restoration of Metropolis used digital technique at a resolution of 2K, which sounds very similar to the resolution SONY's 24P provides. I also notice that ALPHA-OMEGA have made new film copies of all available materials before scaning them into digital format. Do you think that this is an approriate way to treat the endangered old films?
     
  5. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 1999
    Messages:
    10,388
    Likes Received:
    7,659
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Robert Harris
    While 2k scanning may be a high enough resolution for some older or highly-generationed picture elemets, it is not usually considered high enough for film restoration.

    That said, I have not seen the elements on Metropolis and really cannot make any sort comment on them. There may well not be enough infomation to warrant the expense of higher rez scanning and recording. 2k is certainly high enough for a video output.

    RAH
     
  6. Todd_Brown

    Todd_Brown Second Unit

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2000
    Messages:
    389
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Mr. Harris,
    I 've enjoyed this article of yours, and appreciate your contributions both to film preservation and this forum. You mentioned The Wizard of Oz, which release can you recommend as the closest in its presentation, WB or MGM (not to mention the laser disc versions)?
    Todd
     
  7. oscar_merkx

    oscar_merkx Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2002
    Messages:
    7,626
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Just received the German R2 DVD of She Wore a Yellow Ribbon upon the recommendation of Danny Nugteren (bedankt) a fellow member of HTF. Why might you ask ? For the very simple reason that this release from www.kinowelt.de is extraordinary because of an hour long interview that is taken from 1968 done by the BBC. John Ford is engaging and witty and makes fun of the interview by turning the questions around. Thanks also to mr Harris for the endorsement.
    Oscar Merkx
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Andreas Piel

    Andreas Piel Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  9. Henry Carmona

    Henry Carmona Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2000
    Messages:
    1,299
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Location:
    San Antonio
    Real Name:
    Henry Carmona
    Looks like a great site Piel, but i cant read it [​IMG]
     
  10. Martin Hart

    Martin Hart Auditioning

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    [​IMG] Excellent and helpful article on the history of home video and our beloved Technicolor dye transfer process. It hits the high spots so that the unitiated can have a firm grasp of the subject from which to further their studies.
    One minor note on two-component cemented Technicolor prints. Ironically, the two film elements that were dyed and cemented together were the same matrix stock that was later used as a "printing plate" for IB printing.
    In addition to the blessed permanence of Technicolor's dyes, other old systems were equally rugged. While the Cinecolor films that we see in television transfers have that almost "colorized" look, in truth two-component Cinecolor achieved a color fidelity that far exceeded two-component Technicolor, probably because they worked the process for twenty years longer then Tech. Let's hope that some day we may see DVD transfers of Cinecolor films that look as good as they did on theatre screens.
    I've just hooked up with this site and your thread and I intend to make this a regular stop in my browsings.
    Marty Hart
    The American WideScreen Museum
     
  11. Robert Harris

    Robert Harris Archivist
    Reviewer

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 1999
    Messages:
    10,388
    Likes Received:
    7,659
    Trophy Points:
    9,110
    Real Name:
    Robert Harris
    For the uninitiated, Mr. Hart's Wide Screen Museum is THE website for information on wide screen cinema.

    I would suggest that those who have not visited do so. Please have your tickets torn at the door and be kind to the usherettes.

    RAH
     
  12. Gordon McMurphy

    Gordon McMurphy Producer

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2002
    Messages:
    3,530
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Great to have you on board, Marty! You're valued expertise is most appreciated. Great site you have too. [​IMG] Will you ever have a section explaning 3-D formats?
    Merry Christmas! [​IMG]
    Gordy
     
  13. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 1999
    Messages:
    16,738
    Likes Received:
    129
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Welcome to HTF, Martin Hart. Very pleased to have you aboard.
     
  14. Martin Hart

    Martin Hart Auditioning

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2002
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Thanks for the welcome, guys. I don't do much of this sort of stuff so I'm a bit clumsy at it. Hell, I wouldn't even be able to find my way here if I hadn't put a link to this location on the WideScreen Museum website.

    To answer Gordon's question, there are plans to add some coverage of 3-D to the site. It's a lot harder topic to deal with than something as well defined as the history of Cinerama or Todd-AO, though it's unbelievable how murky even their history can get. One problem I have is that there isn't nearly as much source material for me to work from. The great widescreen systems developed in the fifties were widely covered in hundreds if not thousands of publications and I read much of it as a kid during that wonderful era. On the other hand, most of the 3-D stuff originated in small companies that never got much bigger since the 3-D revolution was nearly stillborn. The window of popular 3-D films was barely over a year, though "deepies" have been made on and off for nearly 80 years.

    Marty
    AWSM
     

Share This Page