*** Official "THE HOURS" Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Robert Crawford, Jan 18, 2003.

  1. Robert Crawford

    Robert Crawford Moderator
    Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 1998
    Messages:
    30,356
    Likes Received:
    5,639
    Location:
    Michigan
    Real Name:
    Robert
    This thread is now designated the Official Discussion Thread for "The Hours" please, post all comments, links to outside reviews, film and box office discussion items to this thread.
    All HTF member film reviews of "The Hours" should be posted to the Official Review Thread.
    Thank you for your consideration in this matter.
    Crawdaddy
     
  2. Edwin Pereyra

    Edwin Pereyra Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 1998
    Messages:
    3,500
    Likes Received:
    0
  3. JamieD

    JamieD Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2002
    Messages:
    557
    Likes Received:
    0
    I do as well, Edwin. It isn't hard to see the bias in that article. More likely than not, it is an example of what happens when a reporter is told what the findings should be before they even start looking for information.

    Personally, enjoyed the movie, thought it was very well done, and had a number of interesting themes within it.

    Many men I know don't want to see it simply because they have no idea what it's about. It has not been advertised at ALL around here. Many women I know, on the other hand, simply want to go because of the women in the cast, despite not knowing anything about the movie.
     
  4. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2000
    Messages:
    8,967
    Likes Received:
    0
    I read that article as well yesterday... and I must say I agree. I loved the movie, but I don't see many men, non-movie buffs liking it.
    The portrayal of men who want to help but are either powerless or even completely clueless is not easy to watch for any men. For me, the idea that my woman could be so dissatisfied with life and I can't do anything about it is a terrifying one.
    [EDIT] I have since changed my mind on the above paragraph [​IMG]
    One of the best movies of the year, no doubt, top 3 material.
    --
    Holadem
     
  5. Stephen_L

    Stephen_L Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    Mar 1, 2001
    Messages:
    534
    Likes Received:
    0
    I watched and really enjoyed the film though I must place myself in the "head scratching" category. I could understand and empathize with the sadness the three women felt; one wrestling with mental illness, one trapped in a life she does not want, one investing her life in supporting another. But in the end I was deeply saddened by the choices made by some of the characters. Ms. Moore's character seems so very sad and depressed yet she doesn't share it with anyone. She seemed to be surrounded by people who might have helped. I understand that the 50's was a very staid period but her alternative to abandon her family and ease her pain by passing it on to her son and her husband seems so selfish and wrong. I did empathize with the decision of Virginia Wolf knowing she was loved but terrified of the terrible dark depressions and putting her family through them. The same for Ms. Streep's character who saw some of the emptiness in her life, but kept on working at it, and in the end I sensed the terrible things she experienced would make her wiser and stronger.

    In the end I loved the story and enjoyed seeing some fine women actors older than 18 getting some quality screen time.
     
  6. Edwin Pereyra

    Edwin Pereyra Producer

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 1998
    Messages:
    3,500
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  7. John Geelan

    John Geelan Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2000
    Messages:
    1,087
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm a guy who's heading out tonight with his wife to see "The Hours", she wants to see it.
    It's my gut feeling this is a "chick flick" and I don't see it making much money because it will be hard to draw guys into it.
    I'll report later if I liked the movie.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1998
    Messages:
    7,585
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  9. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1998
    Messages:
    7,585
    Likes Received:
    0
    Now if the article wants to talk about how men are reluctant to go IN THE FIRST PLACE, then we are on to something.

    A talky film featuring a bunch of women talking about their problems, that does seem to scare away a lot of men up front.

    But I can believe the Paramount rep when he says that once men actually give it a chance they like it JUST AS MUCH as the women do. Again with the exception that some women who might not like the film if it was mostly male instead of mostly female will like the film just because of the female character dominance.

    Compare Hours to Glengarry Glen Ross for example. I think they are close in being dialog-heavy films with a slow tempo. But I would also guess that GGR scores worse with women, just like Hours might with men. I think a lot of that comes from the boderline "arty" fans who will give a break to the film they more identify with (by gender roles).
     
  10. John Geelan

    John Geelan Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2000
    Messages:
    1,087
    Likes Received:
    0
    Saw it last night and it is a heavy movie. Basically all the women are all depressed to one degree or another. The men in the movie are basically happy especially the John C Reilly character...he's absolutely giddy [​IMG]
    Great tour de force acting by everybody including that little kid that the Julianne Moore character eventually....well I won't give it away.
    Still I don't see this being even a modest money maker or having the buzz that gets all kinds of people into the theater (usually an Oscar Winner has some sort of mass appeal).
    It is a very good film that movie lovers and acting lovers will enjoy but again the subject (death and longing) are a bit heavy for the average movie fan.
     
  11. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1998
    Messages:
    7,585
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  12. DonRoeber

    DonRoeber Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2001
    Messages:
    1,849
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  13. Tim Glover

    Tim Glover Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 1999
    Messages:
    8,048
    Likes Received:
    323
    Location:
    Monroe, LA
    Real Name:
    Tim Glover
    Saw this tonight. It's well done. Depressing however and perplexing.
     
  14. Seth Paxton

    Seth Paxton Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 1998
    Messages:
    7,585
    Likes Received:
    0
    Good point Don.

    It just adds another point that this is a uniformally "women empowered, men happily ignorant" script.

    It ain't. In fact, it's Streep (and Moore too) who are the most out of touch with Harris' life in the end. Streep doesn't realize that he is only living for her (nor does she totally understand their previous relationship I think). And Moore as a mother doesn't seem to realize what sort of impact her actions have had on her son's life (to a full extent).
     
  15. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2000
    Messages:
    8,967
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  16. ThomasC

    ThomasC Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2001
    Messages:
    6,526
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  17. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    Messages:
    12,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well Thomas, it’s a complex movie, so it’s pretty hard to wrap up briefly, but I’ll make an attempt.
    First off, everything (no matter what era or what character) revolves around Virginia Woolf and her novel, Mrs. Dalloway. There are three sets of characters and four separate time periods, all of which have to do with one aother.
    1st Character Set is Virginia Woolf and her family. The minor time period is when she was wrting the novel, Mrs. Dalloway, (I think the 20s, but I’m not a Woolf scholar), but most of this takes place when she committed suicide (in the 40s, I think, but you might want to check). Mrs. Dalloway, is the story (among many other things) of a woman, seemingly filled with confidence who is preparing for a dinner party. In this simple novel, Woolf plumbs the depths of the human condition, as to our doubts and despair. You will notice that much of what occurs in this time frame revolves around the real life Virginia being unable to contend with even having dinner prepared by her cook for her sister and family.
    2nd Character Set is a 50s housewife and her family and friends. Laura, the housewife, is unable to even bake a cake for her husband’s birthday. Even her young son seems more competent than his mother. She too is despairing and is on the verge of suicide, put pulls back. The obvious connection, is the book she is reading, Mrs. Dalloway and the dinner theme. There is a surprise in store for us later.
    3rd Character Set is set in the present, centering around a woman who is also preparing for a party, this one for a writer friend dying of AIDS. She too is, in the end unsure and filled with self-doubt, though seemingly the most competent of all on the surface.
    There is some physical connection between the second and third plot lines. One way to view this, is that in one story, Woolf is writing the novel, in the second Laura is reading it, and in the third, it is being lived.
    This only begins to scratch the surface of the movie, There are many themes, such as sexuality and the roles we play. It is helpful to have some knowledge of English literature and Woolf though, I think not necessary.
    Hope this helps.
     
  18. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2000
    Messages:
    8,967
    Likes Received:
    0
     
  19. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    2
    It's not the "artist" or "visionary" who has to die. Woolf/Kidman is explaining to her husband, Leonard, why a character in the novel has to die. Of course, the conversation is fraught with subtext, since Leonard is so deeply concerned with his wife's condition, and I can see why the line might leave the impression that it refers specifically to an artist's death. The two deaths in the film are of writers, but the death in Mrs. Dalloway was not.

    M.
     
  20. Holadem

    Holadem Lead Actor

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2000
    Messages:
    8,967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Michael, I know that she was referring to a character in her book. However, I could swear the word "visionary" was used to described said character (I got the impression it was some kind of artist) in the phrase we are discussing, foreshadowing her death and that of Harris' character. Am I off base here? This would be a first [​IMG]
    [EDIT} Oh, I think it was a poet... would someone confirm?
    --
    Holadem
     

Share This Page