NY Times Article on DVDs

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Joe Lugoff, Jun 15, 2006.

  1. Joe Lugoff

    Joe Lugoff Cinematographer

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    The article is entitled "As DVD Sales Slow, Hollywood Hunts for a New Cash Cow":

    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/13/te...gy/13disc.html

    It claims that since the growth in DVD sales is down to only 2% this year, Hollywood needs something new to bring in more revenue.

    Having billions of dollars in revenue apparently isn't enough to make these people happy -- they want something with double-digit annual growth! So now DVDs are "yesterday's technology" as far as they're concerned.

    But lovers of classic movies should get a big laugh out of one line in this article. It quotes "analysts," and only proves that analysts can be clueless at times. Here it is:

    " ... With most movies ... now on DVD, studios are running out of new material to throw at consumers, analysts say."

    Well, if you're only interested in movies from the past few years, I guess it's true. But if you think movies made prior to, say, 1990 matter at all, trust me that MOST movies are NOT on DVD. In fact, for movies made from 1930-65, I'd say less than 10% of them are.
     
  2. Jesse Skeen

    Jesse Skeen Producer

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    The really funny thing is that before DVD came out, they didn't think it would do nearly as well as it did. I'm still trying to do my part to keep them in business, but I haven't been buying as many discs lately for the simple fact that I've already got several hundred that I haven't even watched ONCE yet, and if I keep buying them at the same rate I'll have even more unwatched discs plus no place to keep them!
     
  3. DaveF

    DaveF Moderator
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    Yes. All business look for double-digit growth, not just Hollywood. And if they had been happy with their billions of dollars in revenue ten years ago, we wouldn't have DVDs today. (Applied properly, greed is good.)
     
  4. Marc Colella

    Marc Colella Cinematographer

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    The studios are just spoiled. They got a taste of huge DVD revenues from a few years ago, and now can't seem to take a drop in sales.
    Did they expect the DVD craze to last forever?

    They should count their blessings that VHS was replaced by a format that sold so well and continues to do well even if it doesnt compare to a few years ago.
     
  5. FrancisP

    FrancisP Screenwriter

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    Studios are going to have to learn to market older films. You are probably never going to see the type of revenue dvd brought in. I just don't see average consumers rushing out to buy hi-def copies of movies the way they bought dvds.
     
  6. Joe Lugoff

    Joe Lugoff Cinematographer

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    But that's my point -- there hasn't been a drop in sales at all. In fact, this year is running 2% AHEAD of last year.

    They're disgusted because the GROWTH isn't what it used to be.

    Growth in sales isn't enough for them -- it has to be BIG growth. And although the case can be made that greed is good, saying a technology is dying because it isn't growing as rapidly as it used to strikes me as somewhat paradoxical. Why say "DVDs are dying" when sales are still increasing?!
     
  7. Brent M

    Brent M Producer

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    Well said.
     
  8. seanOhara

    seanOhara Supporting Actor

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    Especially when the BIG growth was fueled by it being a NEW technology, and it's slowing because it's become an old, established technology. Just about everyone who wants a DVD player has one now, so there aren't many new consumers entering the market. The only way for growth to go back up is for people to be able to afford more DVDs.
     
  9. BrettB

    BrettB Producer

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    I think Hollywood should just call it a day and close up shop. They've made enough money. [​IMG]
     
  10. Casey C.

    Casey C. Stunt Coordinator

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    Speaking for myself, my DVD purchases have fallen way off this year because most of my "must-haves" are already in my collection. Most studios have pretty much burned through their "A-list" catalog releases.
     
  11. Chris Atkins

    Chris Atkins Producer

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    Remember the days when DVDs were new and Internet retailers were offering steep discounts?

    I bought most DVDs in 1998-2000 for $5-10 each SHIPPED.

    Those days are of course long over, and with market saturation, of course the growth in the DVD market is slowing.
     
  12. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

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    I'm in the same boat, and I'd like to reduce my collection to 200 or so.

    And I have no interest in upgrading to HiDef.

    I've been through too many upgrades at the hands of the entertainment and computer industry.

    The only product I would be interested in is DVD programs on demand. For example, someone who could package MY favorite music videos, or favorite episodes of a TV program, on a disk, at a fair price, could pry more money from me.
     
  13. Dick

    Dick Producer
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    Hmm. Boys and girls, can you say, "O-i-l c-o-m-p-a-n-i-e-s"?
    To say nothing of nearly every corporation in America owned by stockholders.
     
  14. Steve Armbrust

    Steve Armbrust Second Unit

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    Believe me, I remember those days well. However, a large part of my collection consists of the $5.50, $4.88, and $3.88 movies that Wal-Mart has been selling the past few years. I remember 3 DVDs for $1 and the like, but every few weeks there's a new batch of inexpensively priced movies at Wally World. I suspect they're one of the 200-pound gorillas in this room now.
     
  15. Lars Vermundsberget

    Lars Vermundsberget Supporting Actor

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    As far as I'm concerned, almost all movies that matter were made looong before 1990... [​IMG]
     
  16. Bill>Moore

    Bill>Moore Second Unit

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    My purchases have slowed over the last year or two. We buy a fraction of what we were buying as recently as 2003-2004. Now we have the bulk of what we want. My purchases are more selective. Instead of making an impulse buy to add some variety and choice to my collection, I end up thinking about how many I already have and how long I go between viewing some of them because of the sheer number. I have so many TV shows, I no longer will buy something not dedicated to a Must Have list.

    The studios are kidding themselves if they think there might be additional huge growth in something like HD DVD. Many people consider their DVDs "good enough" and among even the more techy folks, re-purchasing entire collections owned on DVD isn't going to happen. I might replace a few things on HD or BR, but that would be a very small number indeed.
     
  17. Chris Atkins

    Chris Atkins Producer

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    What the studios also have to understand is that many consumers (like me) are weighing further investment in their DVD collection v. new investment in HD-DVD technology. I can't afford to continue to buy DVDs like I did a few years ago if: a) the technology is only going to be fully supported for a little while longer, and; b) I may want to invest in the new technology anyway.
     
  18. Joe Lugoff

    Joe Lugoff Cinematographer

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    I just wanted to respond to this with, "I couldn't agree with you more!" In fact, I'd push it back to 1980 at least.
     
  19. Lars Vermundsberget

    Lars Vermundsberget Supporting Actor

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    And so could I.

    If I don't include some Disney animation from recent years, I'd say only about 3% of the movies in my DVD collection are from 1980 and later.
     
  20. RobertR

    RobertR Lead Actor

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    Hmm, I just bought 4 DVDs for an average price of about 7 bucks SHIPPED, so I disagree. [​IMG]
     

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