now I am confused FPTV cheaper than RPTV?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Marty D., Feb 14, 2002.

  1. Marty D.

    Marty D. Agent

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    Ok, now I am confused. Everywhere I was going locally I was hearing that FPTV was at least 7K to start for a good set-up. Even on these forums. However, now I am hearing people spending 2 or 3K for a decent projector. I was planning on spending 3-4K on a RPTV but would much rather go FPTV if my room would allow (11 by 17 room). Am I confusing the types of projectors people are referring to. Some look like the machine we use at work for presentations. If they are better than RPTV I am ok with that set up. Can someone help me sort this out.
     
  2. VicRuiz

    VicRuiz Second Unit

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    No, we're talking about low-hour used CRT projectors that are going at bargain prices (compared to list) right now. You can get a nice CRT with 3000 hours or less for anywhere between $1000-$3000 depending on the size and model. How do DVDs and HDTV on a 92" screen sound to you?
     
  3. Matt Stryker

    Matt Stryker Screenwriter

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    Marty-

    The main barrier to FPTV (vs RPTV) is not price, it is the ability to control light and the configuration of your room. Your room is great dimension-wise (especially putting the screen on one of the 11' walls); can you control the amount of light in the room?

    My projector is actually designed to be used for mobile presentations, but a side effect is that it is one of the best performers (especially in respect to price) for home theater. It is about the size of a hardback book and weighs about 4 lbs. To contrast, a 58" RPTV will weigh around 240 lbs.

    And Vic is right, the increase in screen area has a tremendous effect on the viewing experience. My first TV was a 27" GE, my second was a 53" Samsung RPTV. My current setup gives me around 13 times the screen area of the GE, and almost 4 times the screen area of the RPTV. And the complete cost of installing it with screen and cabling was around $2500.

    Check out my site for more info on my projector; there are many other "office" models that can be great for home theater, and many HT sites will recommend them.
     
  4. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    Marty, like you, I am on the fence between an RPTV or FPTV. So far, I have this figured out (correct me if I am wrong all you HT veterans):
    RPTV
    Pros:
    Minimal installation/setup
    Works well w/ambient light
    Cons:
    Hard to move/heavy
    Potential screen burn
    FPTV
    Pros:
    Adjustable screen size at little cost
    Unobtrusive/easy to move
    Cons:
    May require complete darkness
    Requires more intensive setup
    Potential fan noise
    No TV tuner included
    My wife would never be able to figure it out
    Thats my list so far. It seems a little weighted towards RPTV. But the screen size option is a big plus in my book.
     
  5. NickSo

    NickSo Producer

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    Real Name:
    Nick So
    Also, remember how much replacement bulbs cost... [​IMG]
     
  6. Marty D.

    Marty D. Agent

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    Well it seems like just whn I sort out one issue (dipoles vs monpoles) I come up with another.

    Let me start by saying my room is off the kitchen in our 2000sft home. Currently, there is a paastrhough window and an open walkthrough area. I plan one sealing that wall and adding a solid door. In the new room there are 2 window areas. One double window is on the corner (long wall)near the new wall. The second is on the back wall in the corner. I WAS going to put a riser on the existing back walk and an RPTV agaist the new wall. The new wall will be 11' wide but will have a 32" door on the far left side.

    Here are my questions:

    What type of a screen image on an FPTV can I get in my room with 11 x 17 dimensions?

    If I go FPTV can I shoot the image on the wall with the door. Is there enough room. (the back wall has a window in the corner so the available width is about the same. Will the window (even with room darkening shades) affect the picture.

    Or should I reverse the seating area and project the image on the opposite wall. This approach would pose promblems placing my side suurounds and have people entering have to avoid the riser platform.

    Also since all the walls are exposed but not the ceiling how would I deal with the wiring of a FPTV. I really don't want to have to tear out sheetrock every time I want to modify my setup. What are some techniques that I could use to be able to get at my wiring? One idea I had was making a wiring closet off the long wall in the corner that goes into the garage.

    This is maddening!!
     
  7. Dave Poehlman

    Dave Poehlman Producer

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    I'm really bad at visualizing verbal descriptions of spaces. But, if you haven't found this yet.. projector central has a java calculator to figure what the screen size would be for a given projector. (or where a given projector would need to be mounted for a certain screen size)
    Find it at: http://www.projectorcentral.com/projection_calc.cfm
     

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