Noah Hawley takes on the next Star Trek movie

Jake Lipson

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Deadline snuck into their article covering this situation the apparently small detail that Tarantino has dropped out as director of the film he was going to make, but Paramount still considers it a viable script.


Again, this whole article makes it seem like no one at Paramount knows what they want to do.
 

Sam Favate

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Again, this whole article makes it seem like no one at Paramount knows what they want to do.
And that’s been the problem for a long time, since Rick Berman stopped being in charge. There are two things missing: one is a Kevin Feige or a Kathleen Kennedy (like her or not, she’s definitely calling the shots) Who is leading the franchise; I like what Alex Kurtzman has been doing with CBS AA Trek, but they are clearly not consulting him on movies. (Maybe they should.) The second thing missing is someone at Paramount who is willing to trust the franchise to the Feige/Kennedy figure without second-guessing or interference. Whether you like what’s been done with Marvel or Star Wars, Bob Iger trusted the people in charge creatively. Sure, he’s made demands of them (this movie must be ready by this date, etc.) but the franchise will rise or fall on its creative merits, something Paramount has never really understood. (They always seem to learn the wrong lessons. For example, in 2002, when Nemesis was a failure, they didn’t say “I guess we made a bad movie,” they said “I guess people are tired of Star Trek.”)
 

Ejanss

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And that’s been the problem for a long time, since Rick Berman stopped being in charge.
For example, in 2002, when Nemesis was a failure, they didn’t say “I guess we made a bad movie,” they said “I guess people are tired of Star Trek.”)
Nemesis was already groomed to be the bigscreen "finale" for TNG, after the flailing, catastrophic gutting and ultimate BO non-starter of Star Trek: Insurrection, but Paramount chickened out of the big series-finale ending of the movie, and gave us Data humming songs instead.

Nicholas Meyer, who'd given us the great Even-Numbered Classics like "Wrath of Khan" and "The Voyage Home", was supposed to write the finale, but was replaced with Stuart Baird as director, who'd never watched the show in his life, and sent the entire movie into a backstage circus, according to the cast.
(And not sure how Nicholas Meyer would have done with TNG, but he's the closest thing we had to a Trek Czar on the old TOS movies.)
 

Osato

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And that’s been the problem for a long time, since Rick Berman stopped being in charge. There are two things missing: one is a Kevin Feige or a Kathleen Kennedy (like her or not, she’s definitely calling the shots) Who is leading the franchise; I like what Alex Kurtzman has been doing with CBS AA Trek, but they are clearly not consulting him on movies. (Maybe they should.) The second thing missing is someone at Paramount who is willing to trust the franchise to the Feige/Kennedy figure without second-guessing or interference. Whether you like what’s been done with Marvel or Star Wars, Bob Iger trusted the people in charge creatively. Sure, he’s made demands of them (this movie must be ready by this date, etc.) but the franchise will rise or fall on its creative merits, something Paramount has never really understood. (They always seem to learn the wrong lessons. For example, in 2002, when Nemesis was a failure, they didn’t say “I guess we made a bad movie,” they said “I guess people are tired of Star Trek.”)
move atated this before but when I saw nemesis in the theater on opening day in 2002 I remember checking my watch wanting to know how much was left.

I can’t recall ever doing this at another movie in the theater.
 
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Jason_V

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Nemesis was already groomed to be the bigscreen "finale" for TNG, after the flailing, catastrophic gutting and ultimate BO non-starter of Star Trek: Insurrection, but Paramount chickened out of the big series-finale ending of the movie, and gave us Data humming songs instead.

Nicholas Meyer, who'd given us the great Even-Numbered Classics like "Wrath of Khan" and "The Voyage Home", was supposed to write the finale, but was replaced with Stuart Baird as director, who'd never watched the show in his life, and sent the entire movie into a backstage circus, according to the cast.
(And not sure how Nicholas Meyer would have done with TNG, but he's the closest thing we had to a Trek Czar on the old TOS movies.)
Frankly, Jonathan Frakes should have stayed as director for the TNG movies after First Contact and Insurrection. He knows the series and the actors like him. Baird is a great editor, but he's not a director. Sure, the script for Nemesis was a pile of junk no one could have polished into a gem; Baird is probably the least of the problems on the film. I'd put John Logan and Brent Spiner higher on the "who screwed this up" list than Baird.
 

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I agree that Paramount seemed lost in what to do. The fact that there were 3 different plans for a Trek movie at the same time proves that lack of vision and a lot of potential waste.

However, it seems that what Emma Watts is doing is possibly trying to find that vision - or, at least a focus. Pick one, or maybe even find a team to do that or develop something else - and move on with one plan. The franchise obviously needed that pause over there. And someone did that.
 

Worth

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Frankly, Jonathan Frakes should have stayed as director for the TNG movies after First Contact and Insurrection. He knows the series and the actors like him. Baird is a great editor, but he's not a director. Sure, the script for Nemesis was a pile of junk no one could have polished into a gem; Baird is probably the least of the problems on the film. I'd put John Logan and Brent Spiner higher on the "who screwed this up" list than Baird.
Nemesis isn't great, but I think it's a masterpiece next to Inserruection.
 

Jason_V

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Nemesis isn't great, but I think it's a masterpiece next to Inserruection.
I'd love to sit down and have a cup of coffee or a beer with you one day to understand your perspective. I don't think I've ever heard anyone use "masterpiece" and "Nemesis" together.

(I'd never argue Insurrection is a masterpiece, either. I just happen to like it more than Nemesis.)
 
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Sam Favate

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Nemesis isn't great, but I think it's a masterpiece next to Inserruection.
I would flip that statement. Insurrection was derivative and disappointing but was at least consistent with the lives of the characters. Nemesis was from another universe. My wife - not usually one to yell at the screen - did a few times during Nemesis, saying "Oh come on!" and so forth. I've still yet to see a movie written by John Logan that I like.
 

Worth

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I've only seen each of them once, but I remember finding Insurrection very dull and hearing terrible things about Nemesis, but finding it moderately entertaining. Part of it may be that I had higher expectations for the former and lower expectations for the latter.
 

Ejanss

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Well, Jake, since you haven't seen any of the old Star Trek TV shows, for the heck of it I'm going to suggest a few episodes to consider watching on Netflix or Amazon, both of which I think have the original series, Next Generation, DS9, and Voyager. Here goes.

For the original show I suggest City on the Edge of Forever, which is from the 1st season and is the 28th episode.

For Star Trek: The Next Generation I recommend Time Squared, which is from the second season and is the 13th episode.

For Star Trek: Deep Space Nine the episode Duet is considered something of a dramatic classic, and it's the 19th episode of the 1st season.

For Star Trek: Voyager the 1st season epic premiere of the show, called Caretaker, is a good little Star Trek movie.
Also, as for the Classic movies, skip, repeat, skip #1 "The Motion Picture", which even Leonard Nimoy regularly dissed in public as "having no idea what the show was about". (Which, we later found out, director Robert Wise hadn't, having never seen the show either, before he tried to turn it into 2001 On Slow Speed.)
Start with one of movie franchises' greatest Do-Overs, #2, "The Wrath of Khan", and you'll see why JJ was so excited to keep fanboy-remaking it every time. Not just best TOS-Trek movie, but arguably Greatest TV-Series Adaptation Movie ever made, and I'll back that up on any thread list.

One time I had to recommend gateway episodes, I ended up picking The Trouble With Tribbles for TOS, since we still get a good iconic Klingon story with all the tongue-in-cheek touches, but it's more of a laid-back episode to hang out with the regular characters. City/Forever is the classic "intellectual sci-fi" episode, but doesn't spend much time in space.
And for TNG, I tried recommending "Best of Both Worlds, Pt. I" just for historic fan-value, and watching it again, yes, the action does manage to sum up the appeal of the show before That Famous Cliffhanger.

Deep Space Nine is more of a continuing arc, and best binged slowly, one episode at a time, to get the appeal of the show, and yes, Voyager never really got any better than the pilot.
 

Osato

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I would flip that statement. Insurrection was derivative and disappointing but was at least consistent with the lives of the characters. Nemesis was from another universe. My wife - not usually one to yell at the screen - did a few times during Nemesis, saying "Oh come on!" and so forth. I've still yet to see a movie written by John Logan that I like.
Star Trek 5 > nemesis
 

Osato

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Also, as for the Classic movies, skip, repeat, skip #1 "The Motion Picture", which even Leonard Nimoy regularly dissed in public as "having no idea what the show was about". (Which, we later found out, director Robert Wise hadn't, having never seen the show either, before he tried to turn it into 2001 On Slow Speed.)
Start with one of movie franchises' greatest Do-Overs, #2, "The Wrath of Khan", and you'll see why JJ was so excited to keep fanboy-remaking it every time. Not just best TOS-Trek movie, but arguably Greatest TV-Series Adaptation Movie ever made, and I'll back that up on any thread list.

One time I had to recommend gateway episodes, I ended up picking The Trouble With Tribbles for TOS, since we still get a good iconic Klingon story with all the tongue-in-cheek touches, but it's more of a laid-back episode to hang out with the regular characters. City/Forever is the classic "intellectual sci-fi" episode, but doesn't spend much time in space.
And for TNG, I tried recommending "Best of Both Worlds, Pt. I" just for historic fan-value, and watching it again, yes, the action does manage to sum up the appeal of the show before That Famous Cliffhanger.

Deep Space Nine is more of a continuing arc, and best binged slowly, one episode at a time, to get the appeal of the show, and yes, Voyager never really got any better than the pilot.
leonard was just pissed at the theatrical because it trimmed out many of his emotional moments.
 

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