No component video input on so many projectors?!

Discussion in 'Displays' started by WaterEC, Apr 13, 2006.

  1. WaterEC

    WaterEC Agent

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    I'm upgrading my home theater TV from CRT to a big screen TV, and my top choice is to use a projector. I'm so surprised to see that a whole bunch of projectors, such as Infocus LP600, Toshiba TDPT9U, don't even have component video inputs?! Anyone who uses a projector will for sure use a screen size at least 50", and I think this requires component video connection to get top quality pictures, so I thought component video inputs is a must for projectors, is it true?

    Also, what price range should be reasonable for a projector? I'm looking for something around $1000. IMHO, if the price goes above $2000, it seems to lose the price advantage of projector vs. plasma or projection TV.

    I'm very new towards projectors. So I'm not sure if my thinking is correct. Could anyone comment? Thanks bunches!
     
  2. Shane Harg

    Shane Harg Second Unit

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    Hmmm...I don't know why this surprises you. Both of the projectors you are looking at are geared toward business presentations. Not home theater. Good home theater projectors start at around the $2000 mark, although I purchased my Panasonic AE900 for around $1650.


    On what basis are you comparing? Certainly not image size. Have you priced out Samsung's 80" plasma TV? $45,000. How about Mitsubishi's 82" LCoS RPTV? $20,000. Projectors can give you an image resolution to rival these machines at over 100," so $2,000 or even a bit more, seems like a no brainer to me.
     
  3. WaterEC

    WaterEC Agent

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    Thanks Shane for your comments. Business presentation projectors don't really need component video inputs, that explains why. As I said, I'm really a novice in the projector area.

    As to my comparison basis, I was only comparing to 50-60" DLP or LCD projection TV, which is in the $2000-$3000 range, which is not really a fair comparison.

    I think I will buy the Panasonic AE900 as you did. I have seen tons of good reviews about it and it seems to have the best propert/price ratio.[​IMG]
     
  4. Shane Harg

    Shane Harg Second Unit

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    You're welcome.

    As much as I like the Panasonic and think it to be one of the best values currently on the market, see if you can get yourself a good demo of it beside a few competing products, such as the Sanyo Z4, Epson 550, Optoma HD72, etc. And do as much research as you can, both on and off the Internet. Retailers will also have their favorites and will likely try to make their own recommendations, but you have to be careful because much of the time, these recommendations are monetarily motivated. Make your own judgement call on the basis of which looks best to you, if you can.
     
  5. WaterEC

    WaterEC Agent

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    Thanks again for your advice. Where did you buy your Panasonic? I don't see it in common retail stores like Bestbuy, Circuit City, Tweeters? I have done some research on the internet only, but haven't done any off internet. From my past experience, HT forum is the best internet forum for home theater related questions, but it's still worth investing some time to take a physical look.

    Also, what screen do you use? I'm thinking of Optoma GrayWolf 92", which seems to be a very popular choice.
     
  6. Shane Harg

    Shane Harg Second Unit

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    To tell you where I bought my projector would be pointless, since I live in Japan, but I went through a high-end dealer, who gave be a good price because I bought my projector, receiver, speakers, screen and all there.

    Places like CC and BB push mostly flat panel and RPTV, so even if you were to find a projector at one of those stores, they won't be able to give you an effective demonstration (nor good advice, for that matter). The run-of-the-mill, everyday electronics stores here are the same way. You'll need to pull out your yellow pages and do a search for specialized audio/visual places. These will most likely have a dedicated HT room, where they should have at least one or two of the above-mentioned projectors set up and ready to give an effective demonstration.

    As for my screen, it's a Japanese product, which is probably not sold over there, but it's an 80" glass-beaded grey screen. I originally ordered it in 100," but after considering my viewing distance and wall space, I had them send back the 100 and order me the 80, which I'm glad I did. The grey helps boost black levels and the glass beads give the image more depth and better contrast. With this screen, and a throw distance of less than 10 ft, I can run the projector on low lamp power with excellent results.
     
  7. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Component video is losing its importance in the HDTV realm because it does not support HDCP copy protection.

    Some projectors have a (manual) switch or menu selection for component versus VGA input, both inputs via the VGA jack. With the needed colorspace conversion, VGA (RGB) gives just as good picture quality for component video sources.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  8. Inspector Hammer!

    Inspector Hammer! Executive Producer

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    Water,
    IMO, I would forget about using componant altogether and go with HDMI (High Definition Multi-media Interface) instead. [​IMG] Although most new HT oriented projectors feature that now.

    This week I just purchased the Sony DVP-NS75H up-scaling dvd player and connected it to my Infocus SP 4805 using HDMI to M1 DVI (Digital Video Interface) and the image is incredible, any video noise that was associated with analog componant video, noise I never even REALIZED was presant in the image before, was all but eliminated and the straight digital to digital feed left me with the purest and smoothest standard def dvd image i've ever seen.

    If you purchase a projector that features HDMI or DVI...USE IT! [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  9. Gregg Loewen

    Gregg Loewen Video Standards Instructor, THX Ltd.
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    hi
    it looks like you are looking at projectors aimed towards the business market. You do not want to do go this route. you need a HT projector with corrected Gamma.
    there are many HT projectors in your price range of $1 -2 K.
    Regards
    Gregg
     

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