No burn it at all on LCD and DLP displays?

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by jeff lam, Oct 18, 2002.

  1. jeff lam

    jeff lam Screenwriter

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    Jeff Lam
    Went to a local HT store and was talking to the sales guy and he said you don't have to worry about burn in at all on LCD and DLP displays but plasma, tube, and RPTV's have burn in problems of course. Is this true? If so, Why?
     
  2. Greg Risley

    Greg Risley Second Unit

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    The simple answer is that the color elements of the crt, rear projection, and plasma displays actually generate thier own light output. DLP and LCR use a single bulb that fires through color elements (filters). LCD's to a smaller amount can get burn in, since they use an electrial charge to make the panels activate but dlp is truely just a lightbulb behind a fast moving primary color filter.

    Greg
     
  3. Steve_L_B

    Steve_L_B Stunt Coordinator

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    This is true. Plasma, direct view and crt based RPTVs use phosphors which age steadily with continued operation. If parts of the screen are exercised more than the rest (i.e. a static bright image that occupies only part of the screen), then that part of the screen will age faster and you may be able to see this in the display. Keeping the contrast turned down to a reasonable level and using a bit of caution virtually eliminates the possiblity of burn-in under normal viewing conditions.

    LCD and DLP based displays do not have phosphors. The use one or more fixed resolution panels illuminated by a lamp to switch individual pixels of light projected onto the screen. LCD panels do age slightly with time, but the rate is very slow and insignificant overall. You have to replace the lamp every 3000 to 6000 hours which costs $200 to $300. Average usage (3 hours a day) is about 1100 hours per year, so this should not be a great concern. Once the lamp is replaced, the display should be like new. Also, UHP bulbs do not degrade much over their life. This means that the picture will remain fairly stable until the lamp dies.

    Hope this helps.

    Steve
     

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