NFL Defense Question

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark Dubbelboer, Sep 11, 2002.

  1. Mark Dubbelboer

    Mark Dubbelboer Screenwriter

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    something i've never really understood-
    the difference between a nickel and dime defence.
    I have a good understanding of football so you don't need to dumb it down too much, this is just something i've never really had explained to me
     
  2. Brian Perry

    Brian Perry Cinematographer

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    Nickel means five defensive backs, Dime means six.
     
  3. Bill Harada

    Bill Harada Stunt Coordinator

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    Nickel = 5 defensive backs
    Dime = 6 defensive backs

    In most cases they usually take the linebackers out. Or in some cases, a lineman, but put a linebacker up on the line instead
     
  4. Dave Falasco

    Dave Falasco Screenwriter

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    According to Howie Long's "Football for Dummies" book, the nickel defense is named (obviously) because of the 5 DBs, and the dime defense is named because it has 2 nickel backs. 2 nickels = 1 dime...oh, those wacky defensive coordinators... [​IMG]
     
  5. Mark Dubbelboer

    Mark Dubbelboer Screenwriter

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    Thanks Dave,
    I was scratching my head as to how 6 dbs make a dime
    and thanks to the rest for the answer

    anyone else have a silly question that they've always been too embarasse to ask?
     
  6. Brad Porter

    Brad Porter Screenwriter

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    OK. I've got one. What is it exactly that makes a "blitz" a "blitz"?

    Is it the number of guys rushing the passer or is it just that a DB is rushing the passer (safety blitz, corner blitz, etc.).

    It seems to me that the defensive ends are always trying to get to the QB, so that leads me to believe that saying that the defense is "blitzing" would have to involve a linebacker or secondary player.

    Brad
     
  7. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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    A ‘blitz’ occurs any time any defensive player other than the down lineman (usually 4, but can be 3, or often in college 5) rushes the passer.

    The term ‘blitz’ itself is short for ‘blitzkrieg’, a type of offensive, tactical warfare first used by the Germans in WWII. It was first proposed and developed by General Gudarian (sp?) after WWI. The concept was to use armor and close air support (mostly the Stuka) to smash through enemy defensive lines, bypass strong points and disrupt command and communications in the enemy rear, thereby creating great confusion in the enemy ranks and allowing the infantry to mop up the resistance. It worked very well in Germany’s early victories in Poland and France, as well as the initial offensive into Russia.

    If you think of the linebackers as tanks and the down linemen as the infantry, you pretty much have got the analogy.
     
  8. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer
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    In Detroit, the nickel defense refers to the actual worth of the players. [​IMG]
     
  9. ikiru

    ikiru Stunt Coordinator

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    I had always thought that a blitz is when you send more than 4 men after the QB. 3 is a standard rush, 4 is a 4-man rush, 5+ is a blitz.

    -ikiru
     
  10. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    If you were in a 3-4 scheme, a rush by one of the 4 linebackers would be considered a blitz.
     
  11. Tom Meyer

    Tom Meyer Second Unit

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    there are also blitz schemes that are specifically designed to stop running plays.
     
  12. Jason Co

    Jason Co Second Unit

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    There are also blitzes where a d lineman will drop into pass coverage. Whee this is fun....

    J
     
  13. Dave Falasco

    Dave Falasco Screenwriter

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    Here's one--if the offense is in a 2 TE set, does the defense still have a strong and free safety? Or are both safeties considered strong?
     
  14. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Depends on whether either 2 RBs are in the slot or if they are simply in an I formation or veer formation. If the RB is in the slot, then you still have a strong and weak safty, but in a balanced formation, you have 2 safties.
     
  15. Dheiner

    Dheiner Gazoo
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    It depends, are both te's on the same side of the center?

    PS. Do you walk to school, or carry your lunch?
     
  16. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

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  17. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer
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    Lew offers a fine explanation. The complexity of the formations is the reason you see so many illegal formation penalties. If a receiver covers a TE by staying on the line of scrimmage, it's a penalty. Put a receiver in motion, and it gets even more confusing.

    I can understand the number of illegal formation penalties, but have never understood why defensive players actually line up offsides so much. How difficult is it to make sure you are behind the line of scrimmage?
     
  18. Dheiner

    Dheiner Gazoo
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    It seems like it must get fairly tough when you're pumped up on "adrenaline".
     
  19. Patrick Sun

    Patrick Sun Moderator
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    Well, if somehow they could put an "imaginary" yellow line (like on TV for the 1st down line) of scrimmage down for the defensive linemen, they would not line up offside. Heh heh.
     
  20. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer
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