Harry-N

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Random, rambling thoughts.

I've been somewhat limited to collecting my absolute favorite shows, no matter the decade. Much of the collection goes from the late 50s with THE TWILIGHT ZONE through the 60s and into the early 70s - I guess that's the age now considered Classic TV.

There are quite a few shows I've watched and enjoyed over the years, but I see little value in collecting hard copies of them. There's just too little time to sit back and re-watch them.

We get a great deal of rewatch value out of the STAR TREK series from all generations, and I have just about all there is. We watch and rewatch M*A*S*H a lot, and just a few other comedies - HOME IMPROVEMENT, MARY TYLER MOORE, THE BOB NEWHART SHOW. We usually watch a half-hour comedy as we settle into bed each night a way to wind down.

We've watched and enjoyed a fair number of the modern CBS procedurals - the CSI's, CRIMINAL MINDS, currently S.W.A.T. and the F.B.I. series. But I can't imagine ever wanting to buy any on physical media. Those are just our current, nightly dramas that provide new entertainment - but not really anything we'd want to rewatch.

For older dramas, I've got full sets of MANNIX and MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE and THE AVENGERS (Mrs. Peel era). A few more modern series that I DID buy due to more intense interest are INVASION, LOST, MOONLIGHT, and TIMELESS.

Old Science fiction favorites go along with the STAR TREKS in rewatchability - TIME TUNNEL, LOST IN SPACE, LAND OF THE GIANTS, VOYAGE TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA, OUTER LIMITS, ONE STEP BEYOND, THRILLER. And I enjoy the 80s version of THE TWILIGHT ZONE as well.

I can think of one 80s series I might buy if they were ever all available - ST. ELSEWHERE.
 

Marvin

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Third Rock from the Sun

I have a bunch of Simpsons season sets that I bought a long time ago, but I tired of the show before I got a chance to watch them.
 
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jcroy

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Random, rambling thoughts.

...

We've watched and enjoyed a fair number of the modern CBS procedurals - the CSI's, CRIMINAL MINDS, currently S.W.A.T. and the F.B.I. series. But I can't imagine ever wanting to buy any on physical media. Those are just our current, nightly dramas that provide new entertainment - but not really anything we'd want to rewatch.
Similar sentiments here too.

In practice, I have found that I only really buy the dvd season sets of a particular procedural when that show is still on the air. Though once the procedural is canceled, in practice I've found that I have very little to no interest anymore in buying the remaining dvd sets.

As a prominent example of this, once CSI was canceled altogether, I had no interest anymore in buying the dvd season sets. (I don't have the final few dvd season sets of CSI with Ted Danson & Elizabeth Shue, and CSI: NY with Sela Ward).
 

JamesSmith

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While I realize the initial DVD release is over, and we're in a pandemic; I still believe that there's quite a few television programs from the nineties and eighties that should be released on Disc. As we all know, it probably won't be by the big companies (excluding Warners). But I'm hoping VEI, Shout and others might attempt to put more product out. But right now, streaming services and an over saturation of the market have lead to a burn out. St. Elsewhere and LA Law are excellent choices to be continued. But that's some time down the line.

--jthree
 

Montytc

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Random, rambling thoughts.

I've been somewhat limited to collecting my absolute favorite shows, no matter the decade. Much of the collection goes from the late 50s with THE TWILIGHT ZONE through the 60s and into the early 70s - I guess that's the age now considered Classic TV.

There are quite a few shows I've watched and enjoyed over the years, but I see little value in collecting hard copies of them. There's just too little time to sit back and re-watch them.

We get a great deal of rewatch value out of the STAR TREK series from all generations, and I have just about all there is. We watch and rewatch M*A*S*H a lot, and just a few other comedies - HOME IMPROVEMENT, MARY TYLER MOORE, THE BOB NEWHART SHOW. We usually watch a half-hour comedy as we settle into bed each night a way to wind down.

We've watched and enjoyed a fair number of the modern CBS procedurals - the CSI's, CRIMINAL MINDS, currently S.W.A.T. and the F.B.I. series. But I can't imagine ever wanting to buy any on physical media. Those are just our current, nightly dramas that provide new entertainment - but not really anything we'd want to rewatch.

For older dramas, I've got full sets of MANNIX and MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE and THE AVENGERS (Mrs. Peel era). A few more modern series that I DID buy due to more intense interest are INVASION, LOST, MOONLIGHT, and TIMELESS.

Old Science fiction favorites go along with the STAR TREKS in rewatchability - TIME TUNNEL, LOST IN SPACE, LAND OF THE GIANTS, VOYAGE TO THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA, OUTER LIMITS, ONE STEP BEYOND, THRILLER. And I enjoy the 80s version of THE TWILIGHT ZONE as well.

I can think of one 80s series I might buy if they were ever all available - ST. ELSEWHERE.
It sounds like you value at least some shows from all TV eras, and I very much do the same. I own a massive amount of TV on DVD, but I would agree with your comment about there just not being enough time to watch many of them. I am trying hard to break my habit of buying things just to sit on the shelf, but I still give in way more than I should.
 

jcroy

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I am trying hard to break my habit of buying things just to sit on the shelf, but I still give in way more than I should.
I'll admit outright that almost all of dvd/bluray my purchases over the past few years, are largely impulse buys.

As a semi-futile way of squelching my impulse buying of dvds/blurays, I've been buying books instead. (The unfortunately side effect is that I'm spending more $$$ on books, than I had ever spent in total on dvds/blurays over the past decade).
 

Robert McNay

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In keeping with the subject of just "newer shows" (i.e. the last 20 years), the ones I have are:

Elementary
Battlestar Galactica remake
Sherlock
Cosmos (new series)
Star Trek Enterprise
 
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jcroy

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Then there's the pure nostalgia factor of those "classic" years. Watching those shows takes me back to a much simpler time.
This is completely subjective. It likely reflects the time period when one was a kid/preteen, where life was carefree with very little to no "adult" responsibilities. (Excluding the scenario if one had a lot of childhood trauma).

(Without getting heavily into politics).

Subjectively I felt that "simpler time" thing too when I was a kid/preteen. Though in reality, it was a time period of high unemployment, high oil prices, high inflation, high corruption, etc ... At a really young age, I had no idea what these "problems" were and didn't know what they meant.

So whatever I was feeling about "a much simpler time", is largely pure nostalgia as a kid/preteen. (ie. My parents / relatives shielded me from all the hard realities going on outside).
 

Wiseguy

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Most of the series I've collected were ones that started in the 1950s or 1960s and ended in the 1960s and 1970s. The only exceptions (so far) are two continuations/reboots of those series: Mission: Impossible (1988-90) and Hawaii Five-0 (2010-20). Other new series I might buy are still more continuations/reboots I don't have access to such as Twilight Zone, Perry Mason and possibly Twin Peaks (I watched the original but only have it on VHS taped off of Bravo). Even if I got Elementary, it's still a reboot since I have the entire Sherlock Holmes series from the 1950s starring Ronald Howard. If Universal would release the 1985-89 Alfred Hitchcock series, I'd probably get that as well (I have it on VHS taped off of NBC/USA).
 
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Purple Wig

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Most of the series I've collected were ones that started in the 1950s or 1960s and ended in the 1960s and 1970s. The only exceptions (so far) are two continuations/reboots of those series: Mission: Impossible (1988-90) and Hawaii Five-0 (2010-20). Other new series I might buy are still more continuations/reboots I don't have access to such as Twilight Zone, Perry Mason and possibly Twin Peaks (I watched the original but only have it on VHS taped off of Bravo). Even if I got Elementary, it's still a reboot since I have the entire Sherlock Holmes series from the 1950s starring Ronald Howard. If Universal would release the 1985-89 Alfred Hitchcock series, I'd probably get that as well (I have it on VHS taped off of NBC/USA).
That’s an interesting angle. Do you like the reboots as a sort of addendum to the original? I find I often avoid them as they often have such a different flavor. For instance, I love the Prisoner, but the reboot was terrible. I watched the first 15 minutes of the Perry Mason reboot and it just seemed like a bleak Dark Knight/Sin City depressing wallow in depravity. Wouldn’t have minded if the 90s Invaders with Bakula continued as a series, especially if they brought Thinnes back and had him play a bigger role than in the TV movie.
 

TravisR

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I watched the first 15 minutes of the Perry Mason reboot and it just seemed like a bleak Dark Knight/Sin City depressing wallow in depravity.
Moments in the first few episodes are like that but the majority of the season is more of a film noir or courtroom drama and less grotesque things like dead babies and bodies with their heads mostly blown off by a shotgun. I'm not saying that continuing to watch is the right move for you but those first few episodes definitely had some gruesome stuff but it didn't really continue.
 

BobO'Link

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That’s an interesting angle. Do you like the reboots as a sort of addendum to the original? I find I often avoid them as they often have such a different flavor. For instance, I love the Prisoner, but the reboot was terrible. I watched the first 15 minutes of the Perry Mason reboot and it just seemed like a bleak Dark Knight/Sin City depressing wallow in depravity. Wouldn’t have minded if the 90s Invaders with Bakula continued as a series, especially if they brought Thinnes back and had him play a bigger role than in the TV movie.
I have yet to watch a reboot I liked and gave up on them all sometime in the 90s. IMHO the old saying "You can't go home again" is 100% true when it comes to reboots/reimaginings of "classic" TV series (and the vast majority of movies).
 

jayembee

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Subjectively I felt that "simpler time" thing too when I was a kid/preteen. Though in reality, it was a time period of high unemployment, high oil prices, high inflation, high corruption, etc ... At a really young age, I had no idea what these "problems" were and didn't know what they meant.
My "simpler" time had the Cuban Missile Crisis, JFK's assassination, and the Viet Nam War.

Even the TV shows weren't always "simpler". A great deal of them were, but there were also Playhouse 90, The Naked City, The Defenders, and others that might seem simpler than what we've gotten used to in the last 20 or so years. But they were definitely a cut above the usual TV fare of the time.
 

Wiseguy

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That’s an interesting angle. Do you like the reboots as a sort of addendum to the original? I find I often avoid them as they often have such a different flavor. For instance, I love the Prisoner, but the reboot was terrible. I watched the first 15 minutes of the Perry Mason reboot and it just seemed like a bleak Dark Knight/Sin City depressing wallow in depravity. Wouldn’t have minded if the 90s Invaders with Bakula continued as a series, especially if they brought Thinnes back and had him play a bigger role than in the TV movie.
Yes, probably as an addendum, particularly like continuations such as Mission: Impossible. Also like the movie series* (although I probably wouldn't have paid them any mind if not for the TV series). But it doesn't automatically mean I'll like the new versions. I like the original Ironside and have it on DVD (although I have had a hard time finding seasons 5-8 in any region) but didn't like the reboot (didn't really have much of chance seeing it with only 4 episodes shown).

Most of the time if I watched the original, I'll at least check out the new series (one of the few exceptions is Bret Maverick I liked, while not caring for the original (which I didn't have much opportunity to see, anyway) or, really any Western. Watched it mostly because I liked The Rockford Files (which it was mostly like instead of the original Maverick.) Normally, if I didn't watch the original, I wouldn't be interested in the remake (The Outer Limits, Battlestar: Galactica, The Love Boat, MacGyver, Magnum pi, etc.) And I didn't care for the new Prisoner, either (forgot all about that one). Didn't care for the movie version of The Wild, Wild West.

The Twilight Zone
is problematical since I didn't care for up to half of the original series especially the final two years, but I did get the bare bones DVD set. And I am interested in seeing the new versions (still haven't finished the 2002-03 version) and right now DVD may be the only method of seeing the latest one, although maybe an edited version (for time and content) might pop up on CBS someday like ST: Discovery for whatever reason. But I don't expect to like it any more than I liked versions two and three.

Keep in mind Perry Mason is not a reboot of the old series but a new adaptation of the novels. That may change your perception. Since I have read most of the novels I am interested in seeing a new interpretation.

*I refuse to believe that that is the same Jim Phelps in the first movie as in the two series. Possibly a relative named after him (if Barney can have a son, why not Phelps?) whom the original recommended for the job after he retired circa 1990. It helped that Jon Voight looked nothing like Peter Graves and was 12 years younger.
 

JamesSmith

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*I refuse to believe that that is the same Jim Phelps in the first movie as in the two series. Possibly a relative named after him (if Barney can have a son, why not Phelps?) whom the original recommended for the job after he retired circa 1990. It helped that Jon Voight looked nothing like Peter Graves and was 12 years younger.
Dear Wiseguy, I respect your feelings about the Peter Graves/Jim Phelps issue. Any time I see a MI film with Ethan Hunt/Tom Cruise, I feel like telling the tv, "you're no Peter Graves or Jim Phelps. You're just a Hollywood pretty boy who thinks he's something when you're not."

As for your explanation of the evil Jim Phelps. I wanted to think something so evil happened with the IMF, that Phelps had to abandon his own identity and let someone else assume his own name and reputation. Something he wasn't truly responsible for, but to save the country he had to sacrifice his own history, and let that charlatan take over being "Jim Phelps."

The REAL Jim Phelps never would have turned. Never.

And that pretty boy Hunt never had one tenth of the integrity that Peter Graves had.

-jthree
 
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Purple Wig

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My "simpler" time had the Cuban Missile Crisis, JFK's assassination, and the Viet Nam War.

Even the TV shows weren't always "simpler". A great deal of them were, but there were also Playhouse 90, The Naked City, The Defenders, than what we've gotten used to in the last 20
Yes, probably as an addendum, particularly like continuations such as Mission: Impossible. Also like the movie series* (although I probably wouldn't have paid them any mind if not for the TV series). But it doesn't automatically mean I'll like the new versions. I like the original Ironside and have it on DVD (although I have had a hard time finding seasons 5-8 in any region) but didn't like the reboot (didn't really have much of chance seeing it with only 4 episodes shown).

Most of the time if I watched the original, I'll at least check out the new series (one of the few exceptions is Bret Maverick I liked, while not caring for the original (which I didn't have much opportunity to see, anyway) or, really any Western. Watched it mostly because I liked The Rockford Files (which it was mostly like instead of the original Maverick.) Normally, if I didn't watch the original, I wouldn't be interested in the remake (The Outer Limits, Battlestar: Galactica, The Love Boat, MacGyver, Magnum pi, etc.) And I didn't care for the new Prisoner, either (forgot all about that one). Didn't care for the movie version of The Wild, Wild West.

The Twilight Zone
is problematical since I didn't care for up to half of the original series especially the final two years, but I did get the bare bones DVD set. And I am interested in seeing the new versions (still haven't finished the 2002-03 version) and right now DVD may be the only method of seeing the latest one, although maybe an edited version (for time and content) might pop up on CBS someday like ST: Discovery for whatever reason. But I don't expect to like it any more than I liked versions two and three.

Keep in mind Perry Mason is not a reboot of the old series but a new adaptation of the novels. That may change your perception. Since I have read most of the novels I am interested in seeing a new interpretation.

*I refuse to believe that that is the same Jim Phelps in the first movie as in the two series. Possibly a relative named after him (if Barney can have a son, why not Phelps?) whom the original recommended for the job after he retired circa 1990. It helped that Jon Voight looked nothing like Peter Graves and was 12 years younger.
The movie version of the Steed/Peel Avengers was one of the worst things I’ve ever seen in the theater.

I’d be interested in seeing the Monte Markham Perry Mason.
 

bmasters9

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It sounds like you value at least some shows from all TV eras, and I very much do the same. I own a massive amount of TV on DVD, but I would agree with your comment about there just not being enough time to watch many of them. I am trying hard to break my habit of buying things just to sit on the shelf, but I still give in way more than I should.
You're not the only one who does that-- I have an extensive back stack I've hardly even touched!
 

jcroy

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You're not the only one who does that-- I have an extensive back stack I've hardly even touched!
(More generally).

I felt the same way for just about any hobby I had which involved "collecting" a lot of stuff.

For example, such as the monthly comic books treadmill. (Nowadays new issues are easily $4 each).
 

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