Newbie: Which widescreen TV to buy?

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Dan*C, Aug 26, 2003.

  1. Dan*C

    Dan*C Auditioning

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    Hi all. This is my first post here. It looks like a great place to hang out! I'm one of the many who's been hanging back watching for High definition programming to become available before taking the plunge on a big screen high definition TV. Our local cable companies are starting to make HDTV available little by little so I'm looking to set up a home theatre of sorts. I went to our local family owned high end electronics store and they steered me towards the new Sony LCD TV's over the more expensive Plasma TV's or the bulky CRT's. What do you guys think?

    Thanks

    Dan
     
  2. Ted Lee

    Ted Lee Lead Actor

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  3. ChrisLazarko

    ChrisLazarko Supporting Actor

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    LCD's are very nice. There resolutions have become better over the last few years. Unfortunatly some stuff to remember is that when a pixel goes dead on an LCD (dead pixel is a small pinnk dot on the screen that is very visible) the company WILL NOT replace it unless there are somewhere around 7 or more dead ones which is very annoying and pixels can die at any time, it is not an uncommon event.

    I would probably suggest if you have the room for a normal rear-projection TV that Mitsubishi's are very nice TV's. I would take a look at them, they make HDTV ready TV's and Upgradables, so if you don't have the money at the time you can always upgrade in the future.

    The Mitsubishi's also feature a very nice picture. I currently own a 50" Mitsubishi Tv myself and I love it.

    As for bulb life on a TV, an LCD has a very good lifespan of about 50,000 hours usually. A normal rear-projection has the same life but of course with a rear-projection you won't have any problems with dead pixels.

    As for the new RPTV's I believe there bulb's lifespan is about 3,000 hours or something very little. After that a bulb replacement is about $400 or so and is not worth it in my opinion when a TV that is 24" thick can last over 15x that.
     
  4. Adam Hood

    Adam Hood Auditioning

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    Did u consider the DLP TV's from Samsung? The Sony Wega LCD Projections are a little over rated, when you can get the same picture from a panny 50" LCD for considerably less. LCD projection looks nice, but is definetly a waste of money. Go DLP, you won't be sorry.

    But the salesman you talked to is right... plasma's aren't always the way to go, and yes CRT projections are bulky, but yet they are still VERY affordable.
     
  5. David Abrams

    David Abrams Stunt Coordinator

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    Dan,

    Good to have you on the forum. There are a lot of good choices for display devices out there. I really like the CRT technology still. Nothing beats it in terms of picture quality; however, there are some applications where you would not use it.

    If you can fit a CRT display in your viewing room I would highly recommend trying to do so. Even if it is a refurbished CRT Front Projector and screen (you would need ambient light control). The benefits of a CRT for critical viewing are high and the cost for a CRT display is generally cheaper than the other technologies (at leas for most RPTVs).

    Regards,
     

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