Newbie trying to figure out what plugs where help!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Christopher_P, Jul 9, 2002.

  1. Christopher_P

    Christopher_P Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ok Here's what I have:
    Sharp 27" TV(A/V, Svideo, and normal ol' cable jacks)
    Onkyo HT-s650(Reciver, speakers, sub)
    Philips DVD player
    Consoles(ps2, xbox, dreamcast, plus some older ones but those are on another tv. The ps2/xbox/DC are plugged into an a/v selector box currently)
    Panasonic VCR
    Trying to figure out how to get this all plugged up right now that I've bought the Onkyo audio in a box. Read the book/FAQs and I'm still confused. Can anyone help a newbie out step by step? Also I have normal ol' cable tv. The link below was sorta helpfull but I want to make sure I'm doing this right [​IMG]
    http://www.onkyousa.com/hookup.cfm?new=y&m=HT-S650
     
  2. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Christopher,

    Welcome to the forum!

    Do you use a cable box to tune the cable, or do you use the VCR or the TV?

    The basic issue would be this:
    DVD video composite cable connected from the DVD output to the composite DVD input on the receiver.
    DVD digital audio output to the DVD digital audio input on the receiver (not sure what type your receiver of DVD player offers).

    VCR video composite cable connected from the VCR output to the VCR composite input on the receiver.
    VCR audio analog red/white output plugs to the VCR analog audio input on the receiver.

    Videogame selector box video composite output cable to the Aux composite input on the receiver.
    Videogame audio analog red/white output plugs to the Aux analog audio input on the receiver.

    Connect the monitor output composite video from the receiver to the video input composite on the TV.


    There are some extra complex ways you can do this- like connecting the digital audio signals from the PSX2 and Xbox- but I'm not sure how many digital inputs your receiver has.

    The above basic config will get audio and video routing through the receiver- and get you started-- we can streamline and get completely specific if you can let us know:
    1) how many digital audio inputs on the receiver (what type: optical or coax?)
    2) How many different inputs does it offer that have video input- and what are they labeled (VCR, DVD, Sat, Aux, etc?)
    3) What type of digital audio output does your DVD player offer? How about the PS2 and the Xbox?
    4) How do you tune the cable (what do you use the change channels)?


    Is there a direct link to the manual for this receiver online? I looked but couldn't find the 650 in the drop-down box for receiver manuals...

    -V
     
  3. Christopher_P

    Christopher_P Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    So basicly it would go:
    DVD a/v - reciever
    A/V box(consoles) - reciever
    VCR a/v - reciever
    But what about the cable line(using a cable box. it only has 'normal' cable plugs)? Run the cable line to the cable box then to the tv?
    The Reciever is the HT-R500(b) doesn't seem to be listed on the online manuals. Here's what the back of the receiver looks like [​IMG]
     
  4. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0


    You can do it that way- however the cable audio will not be available through the receiver. I'm not sure if that's an issue for you- I personally prefer to route everything through the receiver and use it for all audio.

    You could contact you cable company and request a cable box with composite video and analog audio outputs which you could route to the receiver. Of, if you don't have any scrambled premium channels- you could simply use your VCR as the tuner for the cable system...

    From the diagram you posted it looks like you only have 3 video inputs anyway (DVD, Vid1, Vid2). So, even if you had a cable box with the proper outputs- you'd probably have to route it through the video game switcher anyway- because the receiver doesn't have enough inputs.

    It looks like your receiver has 3 digital inputs (2 optical, one coax). One of these should be used for your DVD player. Do not connect your DVD player using the analog red/white connection-- instead make sure to connect it from the digital output on the player to one of the digital inputs on the receiver. I'm not sure which one you will use because you didn't mention what types of digital output your components had.

    So, the best basic hook up would be:

    DVD video composite output from the DVD player to the composite input DVD on the receiver (yellow jack).
    DVD digital audio from the digital audio output jack on the player to one of the digital inputs on the receiver (you will probably need to access the setup menus in the receiver to assign the particular digital connector to the DVD input).

    VCR video and audio outputs to the Video 1 IN jacks.

    Video game switchbox video and audio outputs to the Video 2 IN jacks.

    Monitor output from the yellow composite jack on the receiver to the video input on the tv (the tv will need to be switched to see this input- if you don't know how, check the manual).

    -Vince
     
  5. Christopher_P

    Christopher_P Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2002
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Ok I think I got most of that heh but on the cable tv end of it do I run the cable line to the VCR then will the
    TV get the cable signal since the VCR will then be hooked to the receiver(and then the tv) via a/v plugs?
     
  6. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    6,499
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yeah- if you don't have premium channels that need the box to be descrambled- you can plug the cable line directly from the wall into the VCR's RF input. You can then use the VCR's tuner to change channels and the video and audio signals will be passed out the AV outputs (and thus into the receiver and onto the TV set).
    You could also run the RF output from the VCR directly to the TV- that way you'd have two connections- one using the Receiver audio and one that you could just use the TV speakers (if you switch the TV to the RF input). I don't know if that is needed- but some people like to have a "simple" setup without the receiver, just in case.
    I hope that makes sense.
    Now onto another issue I avoided until I was sure you understood everything so far...
    I suggested that you route all the composite video through the receiver and then onto the TV. I did not mention the SVIDEO connection because you have a VCR, and most VCRs don't offer a SVIDEO output. Unfortunately- with most AV receivers- you cannot "mix" composite and svide- it will only work with one or the other (it does not convert between the two).
    However- you will get an improved DVD picture using svideo, and your TV has an svideo input... so you should consider using it as well.
    There are two main approaches to doing this:
    1) Route all the components through the receiver using composite. Then run a svideo line from the DVD player directly to the TV. This way your receiver will still do basic video and audio switching for you- however when you settle in for a serious movie watching session- you can flip the TV to the svideo input and get the improved video from the DVD player.
    2) Route all the components through the receiver using composite. For any devices which offer an svideo connection (DVD, Videogames)- plug them into the receiver also using svideo. Route the SVIDEO monitor out to the TV. Using this config you will always have video from any source using the composite input-- and for those devices which have svideo as an option- you can kick the TV over to the svideo input for the improved picture (and you'd switch it back to composite for sources like VHS which don't offer svideo)
    I think in your case #1 is the best option- as #2 would mean you would need a switch box for the video games that did Svideo (you didn't mention if your current unit does or not).
    Again- with either configuration- you can work just fine using the composite cable setup and never have to switch- however you have the option to switch over to svideo and take advantage of the improved picture.
    Of course- you could always buy a VCR with an Svideo output and then run everything exclusively svideo- but no one (other than me) ever seems to go for that idea!
    [​IMG]
    -Vince
     

Share This Page