Newbie question Re: Film projection

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Ricardo C, Mar 11, 2002.

  1. Ricardo C

    Ricardo C Producer

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    *Still very much an HT newbie, so please don't flame me too much if this question is stupid*
    Check this (admittedly humorous) theater's FAQ.
    All in all, I was having a big laugh, till I reached this question:
    "Q: Why is it I see microphone booms on the top of the frame in movies in your theater?
    A: Because we are special. It is an honor bestowed upon only the coolest theaters.
    And it might also be that I can put in a different plate that crops the image (aperture plate), but it would make the movie seem like you’re viewing it through a mail-slot. Sometimes I can frame the image down and eliminate most of that, but that often leads to seeing the spot lights normally below the frame. So, I leave it alone and it gives you something to tell your grandchildren about."
    A friend of mine saw A Beautiful Mind in a crummy local theater, and saw boom mikes. We chalked it up to a misframed picture. We started searching the web for an answer, and came up with the site. But this guy makes it sound as if framing his movies properly (which is what I think he implied by "seeing it through a mail slot") is undesirable. Is he poking fun at his own inexperience as a projectionist, or saying that he prefers "faulty" framing? or is he taking about something entirely different and I'm looking like a moron for even asking? [​IMG]
     
  2. Chauncey_G

    Chauncey_G Second Unit

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    I think he's just screwing around.
    Although, it also sounds like he either has the wrong kind of aperture plate or he has the right kind and the aperture has been sized incorrectly. He talks about how framing it down will cause the spot lights below the screen.
    A properly sized aperture plate will let the proper amount of light through to fill the screen, and only that. If the apperture is too big (which may be the case here) then the light will bleed over the boundaries of the screen. Since the frame line itself is black, then it may be acting as masking on the bottom part of the screen, but when moved (as he adjusts the framing to get rid of boom mikes) then the bleed through becomes apparent.
    At your crummy local theater, whoever started the show probably didn't pay enough attention to notice the framing was a little low, thus allowing the audience to see the booms at the very top of the frame. This kind of thing is common in today's multi-plexes where the kid that just sold you your popcorn could very well be the one that starts your film.[​IMG]
     
  3. Ricardo C

    Ricardo C Producer

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    Thanks for the answers! [​IMG]
     

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