Newbie! New system, compatibility questions

Discussion in 'Beginners, General Questions' started by StephenB, Dec 12, 2003.

  1. StephenB

    StephenB Extra

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    Hello --
    What a pleasure to find a site full of such helpful (and grown-up) home theater aficionados. Hope you don't mind yet another newbie with yet another bunch of simple questions.

    A couple of weeks ago, I upgraded and expanded my system, pretty much without knowing what I was doing. Maybe someone could point me to specific areas to consider that I might not know need considering, if you follow.

    My system:
    30' Samsung 16:9 HDTV (TXN3075WHF)
    Sony progressive DVD/SACD player (DVPNC685V)
    Yamaha receiver (RX-V540)
    Klipsch KLF-10 mains (the only survivors of the old system)
    Klipsch SC-1 center
    Klipsch SS.5 surrounds
    Klipsch KSW-12 sub

    I'm very happy with the sound and am comfortable with the "how it works" aspect there. But I'm a bit confused with the video side.
    I set up the DVD player so that it knows it's feeding a signal to a 16:9 TV. It looks great to my eyes. And I've been through the very helpful FAQ on this site, but I still have a few questions. The TV is labeled as "1080i," which I understand means interlaced. But how is that compatible with a DVD player that puts out a progressive signal? Is there such thing as 1080p?
    And is it true that the DVD player puts out a signal that does not take full advantage of the resolution on my TV?

    Thanks for helping.
    Steve
     
  2. Jeff Gatie

    Jeff Gatie Lead Actor

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    First, DVD is NTSC based, not HDTV.

     
  3. StephenB

    StephenB Extra

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    Okay.
    How does that work in terms of refresh rates and scan lines and frames and so forth? How does progressive scan fit into the interlaced framework? I was under the impression that interlaced is a hardware characteristic -- am I wrong?
     
  4. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Well, the idea is a simple one of how many times the beam can go back and forth. For simplicity sake, 1080i and 540p would be the "same" in terms of number of lines that are drawn at a time.

    If you think of it that way, your TV's "drawing" is capible of 540 lines progressive, or 1080 interlaced, in terms of it's speed. In which case, it has more than enough speed to be able to output 480 lines progressively.

    Now it gets a bit more complex with non-crt tecnologies (LCD, DLP for example) which ahve a fixed resolution panel for display... and of course the idea of what a set can sync to and what it can fully resolve are other issues...

    But in a basic sense- reall the limitiation of the display, the the case of CRT type technoogy, is how fast the beam can move. With your set, the fastest it can sync to is 1080i/540p- in which case it should be able to display 480p...

    -V
     
  5. StephenB

    StephenB Extra

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    I get it. Thanks. Cool.

    What's the standard resolution of HDTV broadcast? (I haven't hooked up cable HDTV yet)
     
  6. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    DTV itself supports many resolution, both standard and High Def. The trwo resolutions considered high definition are 1080i and 720p.


    I think most stuff is in 1080i, although i think any HD tuner (including cable boxes) have the ability to change the output of 720p to 1080i for those who don't support 720p.

    -Vince
     
  7. StephenB

    StephenB Extra

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    And I would infer then that, all other things being equal, 720p is a "better" signal than 1080i, yes?

    Thanks for your help and patience, Vince. I think I'm on to it.
     
  8. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    Judgment call. You get into the idea of pixels total versus on screen versus your aunt Tillie-- there are a lot of opinions on what make something "best" and often it can't be read from the numbers, if you know what I mean.

    In terms of hardware and the "umph" it takes to make the signal, 720p takes a faster scan rate than 1080i... and Joe Kane (the guy behind the ISF and the Video Essentials disc) has repeatedly come out saying 720p looks significantly better, all other things being equal (although they seldom are).

    The bottom line is 1080i is easier to achieve, and therefor often cheaper- so it's what most consumer sets can do...

    -Vince
     
  9. TylerLEK

    TylerLEK Auditioning

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    What about 1080p? Is this too fast for the light creating elements to acheive? Or is it too much data to even get to the light creating elements?
     
  10. Vince Maskeeper

    Vince Maskeeper Producer

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    I don't know the scan rate of 1080p off the top of my head, but it is obviously in excess of what a standard HD device is currently able to achieve (or at least the majority of consumer big screens).

    That isn't to say it is impossible- conventional computer monitors have been doing resolutions this high for a while- and the talk of 1080p compatible devices and projectors exist for the commercial and high-end market.

    Eventually I'm sure you'll see devices which can do full 1080p and "line doublers" which deinterlace 1080i high-def signals.

    -Vince
     

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