Newbie information

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Gregg Pearson, Feb 20, 2002.

  1. Gregg Pearson

    Gregg Pearson Auditioning

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    Hey guys, as you are going to find out with my question as to how new I am to this stuff, but, What are seperates? I am just about to dive into the HT world and I am trying to figure all this stuff out.

    I thought I was ready to purchase my system, but the more I read, the more I am not sure. I have about $1500 to spend and everyday, I come here, I learn something new.

    Right now, I think Im going to get the S595 receiver, from there, its up in the air. Have heard good things about the NSP1's, but I am not sure yet..
     
  2. Larry B

    Larry B Screenwriter

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    Gregg:

    A receiver is actually 3 units all in 1 box: (1) a preamplifier (and digital processor, in the case of a Home Theater receiver), (2) amplifier (for multiple channels), and (3) a tuner. "Separates" refers to buying each of these units....separately. That is, one buys a multi-channel amplifier, and one also buys a preamp-processor. (Tuners are optional). Thus, you have to purchase two distinct items.

    As with most things in life, there are advantages and disadvantages to each, and differences of opinion as to which is "better." One of the main advantages of a receiver is simplicity; everything is in one box, so you don't need lots of shelves, nor lots of wires. In addition, receivers tend to be the first to have the latest Home Theater technology, such as DPL II. The advantages of separates is (1) many people think they ultimately sound better (though there is not universal agreement on this), and you can upgrade one part independent of the other. For example, if you need more power, you can buy a bigger amp. Or if a new digital processing technology comes out, you can buy a new preamp processor but still use the old amplifiers.

    Hope that helps...

    Larry

    P.S. In your price range, I don't think there will be many choices in separates, so you're probably better off with a receiver. And I should mention that even if you buy a receiver, you can still at a later date add an external amplifier. Many people who own receivers buy a new amp for the front channels, and use the amps in the receiver for the center and surrounds.
     
  3. Gregg Pearson

    Gregg Pearson Auditioning

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    Thanks, Larry...Im in information overload and Im trying to soak it all in. I appreciate your help and will go with the receiver to start with.
     
  4. Larry B

    Larry B Screenwriter

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    Gregg:

    Glad I could be of help. I myself am actually new to the world of HT, as my main passion is 2-channel. There are many very knowledgeable individuals here, most of whom are more than happy to help, so you should never hesitate to ask a question.

    Regards,

    Larry
     
  5. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

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    Greg
    There's also a "HT basics" area that has lots of great posts each day if you're just learning. Welcome to the forum!
     

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