Newbie bipolar/dipole speaker question

Discussion in 'Speakers' started by Brett_Y, Dec 3, 2003.

  1. Brett_Y

    Brett_Y Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2003
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    i am setting up a HT and plan on using a 5.1 THX system . The only thing i have so far is the subwoofer. I am now shopping for receiver and speakers. can anyone tell me what the whole bipolar/dipole thing is about and what i should use for center/front/rear? If it matters my room configuration is conducive to towers for the front speakers and in-wall or small bookcase speakers in the back. I know i have a long way to go before i really understand all of this but i wanted to get this issue out of the way first


    Thanks alot


    Brett
     
  2. Lew Crippen

    Lew Crippen Executive Producer

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    Messages:
    12,060
    Likes Received:
    0
    Welcome Brett. You can find the answer to your question in the HTF Glossary , located in the Basics area. You might also like to check out the FAQ.
     
  3. Brett_Y

    Brett_Y Auditioning

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2003
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    thanks. My undderstanding is that i should use Dipole for the rear/side surround speakers. What type do i use for the front right/left?
     
  4. Edward J M

    Edward J M Cinematographer

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2002
    Messages:
    2,031
    Likes Received:
    0
    The bipole surround has two radiating surfaces, usually at a 90 degree angle. Each surface has a tweeter (2 total), and sometimes each surface has a midrange driver too (but I've also seen them where only one surface has a midrange driver).

    The dipole is simply a bipole speaker with the opposing drivers out of phase with respect to each other. This can result in a diffuse (hard to localize) sound field. The dipole setting (usually just a switch) works best when the speakers are directly to the side of the listener, and elevated above head level.

    For a 5.1 rig, you might want to use direct radiating monopoles in the rear. If you use a bipole speaker in a 5.1 rig, most recommend leaving it in the bipole mode, and placing it more to the rear of the listening area as opposed to directly at the sides.

    Your results may vary, of course - some members use five identical speakers in a 5.1 rig with good results.
     

Share This Page