Newbie asks about RPTVs, FPTVs and DVTVs...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Graham Martin, May 22, 2002.

  1. Graham Martin

    Graham Martin Stunt Coordinator

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    I have read the entire primer from the basics thread and I didn't see anything that compared the three types of display devices and their underlying technologies. (I may have missed it.) I know alot about DVTV and a good amoutn about RPTV, but I looking at my needs I am thinking of FPTV. Anyone have a link to a resource that explains the three types of display devices and their underlying technologies, points our each technology's weaknesses and strengths and makes recomendations based on what is important to any given viewer and room config?

    PS: My thread about being a newbie with $3500 burning a hole in my pocket got a gret number of responses, but left me wondering more than I ahd been before!

    Thanks all!
     
  2. James Bergeron

    James Bergeron Supporting Actor

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    Well each depends on other factors as well. For example there are more than 1 FPTV techonology as well as RPTV and DVTV.

    There is DLP, DILA, CRT, LCD
    So first you have to understand the differences between these.

    Most of your RPTV's are CRT and DVTV are a form of CRT as well.

    FPTV can be any of these and most of the stores will try to sell LCD or DLP.

    CRT in my opinion is still the best.

    You may want to take a look at avsforum to get more information on these things.
     
  3. Graham Martin

    Graham Martin Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the reply! Yes, these are exactly the things I am curious about. (The difference between DLP, DILA, CRT, and LCD.) I know what they stand for, but I seek more in-depth info on the basics behind their approaches from a technical standpoint and what those differences result in when you sit down to watch a DVD. (E.g. "CRT is the best because it delivers the best picture per dollar" or "DLP can produce the best image but costs more and here's why" or "LCD should be considered for peopel who don't watch NTSC material because of issue X Y or Z") NOTE: I just made up the statements to demonstrate the area of knowledge for which I am looking.

    Everyone says read the forum basics and visit the AVS site, but I don't seem to be able to find a link to a source that breaks down the different technologies, explains their differences and the ramifications of those differences.

    Any tips on a source of info like that?

    Thanks again!
     
  4. James Bergeron

    James Bergeron Supporting Actor

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    Well for that kind of indepth ansuwer I think you will require to do a lot of reading. Honestly I have been reading avsforum for a few months and got a feeling about the differences in the types of technology.

    I think the answers that you posted are things that you would have to evaluate personally.

    For example: CRT is the best because it provides the best picture for the dollar.

    Well this is subjective, and some other examples you provided are subjective.

    My take on things is this.

    CRT, best picture quality available,
    long lasting / proven techonology
    capable of HD and many sources (depends on unit of course)
    Colors are bang on blacks are inky.
    takes time and care and constant fidling

    DLP, great picture, good for room with less light control than a CRT projector room.
    Bulbs need replacing so there is a cost to ownership which is real (Ex: may cost $2 for every hour of use for the bulb)
    Can have rainbow issues (depends on speed of color wheel and perosn)
    Blacks aren't inky but they ar egood, orange is off on a lot of units.
    Easy to setup and use

    LCD, basically the same as DLP except rainbowing is eliminated, you have to becareful about resolutions that the unit can do as they are set in stone (DLP is like this as well). CRT has variable resolutions.
    Change of pixel burnouts, bulb life (same as DLP)
    Colors are great
    screedoor effect possible.
    easy to setup and use (small light)

    DILA, well this is the one I'm a little sketchy on, but it's similar again to DLP and LCD, but seems to be better, than both, but more expensive. I believe blacks are better.

    If you want to get really technical i think You will have to do a lot of reading.

    Basically you can use ANY of these technologise for HT.

    I chose CRT because I got a good deal, and the picture is stunning. I was seriously considering a DLP but factored in the cost of bulbs and didn't like the fact I would have to change them. CRT's can last for years and years.

    Anything else you want to know?
     
  5. Graham Martin

    Graham Martin Stunt Coordinator

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  6. Drew Eckhardt

    Drew Eckhardt Stunt Coordinator

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    Apart from the discontinued Zeniths which are being closed out for a hair under $4K you won't find new CRT projectors under $8K; although you can almost have your choice of used and retubed units for under $5K (with original MSRPs up to $30K).

    Few CRT projectors include on-board scalers or line doublers, so you'll need to figure that into the price too. For a 7" projector, the iScan will probably work. 8 and 9" projectors with electromagnetic focus create very fine scan lines, and will need something more than 480p (I run 960p) to avoid projecting images that are 1/3 to over 1/2 black lines between lines of image. AV science has/had b-stock Quadscans for about $500, TV Authority had new ones for about $900. For more flexibility, image quality, and pain you can also use a specially configured PC.

    For screens under 8' wide, you'll get the best video out of a CRT although it's not plug-and-play, small, or maintenance free.
     
  7. Graham Martin

    Graham Martin Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for the additional info. This is really eye-opening. It is sounding like DLP is the best "bang for your buck" if you want new equipment, front projection and
     
  8. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    Bulbs are definitely a worry with digital projection, in terms of costs, however, it is rare to find a $2/hour bulb.

    The most expensive are the 1000 hour 500 watt D-ILA bulbs that cost $500 to replace (50 cents/hour bulb). However, most LCD/DLP bulbs last about 2000 hours and cost about $400 or less (about 20 cents/hour). On the extreme end, there are projectors that use bulbs that last 6000 hours and cost about $400 each (less than 7 cents/hour).
     
  9. James Bergeron

    James Bergeron Supporting Actor

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    Gabriel, on the bulb issue that is true, but I was thinking canadian funds as usual :) and the LT150 costs around $1000 CDN for 2000 hours which is pretty expensive, and others are more in Canada.

    As far as cheap CRTs well I personally picked up an electrohome M8000 an 8" CRT for $4000 CDN so about $2500 US, the tubes are mint and the machine works perfectly. THere are great deals from Curt on Avsforum all the time.

    But like Drew said, you can't go much bigger than 8' wide (which I find PLENTY big). And you do require a scaler, I currently use an RP-91 dvd-player with a converter for component and the progressive signal is truely amazing. I also have a doubler for DSS which I rarely use anyway.

    I would agree, DLP could be your best bang for the buck, there are some faily inexpensive units now available. Some great LCDs as well which may be a better bang fort he buck. I would cuggest seeing if you can demo some anywhere. I find most A/V stores don't have much in terms of FP yet, but if you contact a presentation store (for business projectors) you may be pleasantly surprised, some will do in home demos and such!
     
  10. Gabriel_Lam

    Gabriel_Lam Screenwriter

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    James,
    Ah, a Canadian. Gotcha. [​IMG] The LT150's bulb is under $300 here, so it's only 15 cents/hour.
    The M8000 is incredible. If I only had the home theater room to be able to use one.
     

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