New widescreen owner has simple question...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Alex-C, Jun 27, 2002.

  1. Alex-C

    Alex-C Screenwriter

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    I just got my Mits 65" widescreen (65809 for those who are keeping score). I like to think I know what is up with this kind of stuff, but I am stumped with this one:

    Good Will Hunting, its 1.85:1 but on my Panny Rp-56, it doesnt fill the screen, it looks a little squished. It looks like a 2.35:1 movie: there are black bars on top and bottom.

    All my other 1.85:1 movies, all of them are screen fillers (i.e. You've Got Mail, As good as it Gets, Uncle Buck).

    Is this some non-anamorphic thingy ? Should I not be using the progressive scan feature of the Panasonic rp-56 ? Obviously I checked my DVD player and it is set for a 16x9 screen. And no other changes are made to the Mits (format is standard).

    Do DVD players sometimes just screw this up on certain discs ?

    What am I missing ?
     
  2. Steve Blair

    Steve Blair Second Unit

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    GWH is nonanamorphic, you need to use the zoom mode to watch this dvd. I have a toshiba widescreen so your modes may have different names than mine. On my tv FULL mode is for anamorphic dvds. Theatrewide2 is for viewing non-anamorphic dvds. Check your owner's manual or do a search here on the forum for the appropriate modes to use on the Mits widescreen sets for non anamorphic dvds.
     
  3. Randy A Salas

    Randy A Salas Screenwriter

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    The BVHE/Miramax DVD is not anamorphic.
     
  4. GlennH

    GlennH Cinematographer

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    Your Mitsubishi TV assumes that anything using the progressive inputs is anamorphic. If it isn't (like GWH) the image will be squashed and stretched horizontally. You need to switch the RP56 to interlaced mode (button on the front) and use the TV's zoom to fill your screen horizontally.

    My Pioneer Elite 610 does the same thing, but I use the Panasonic RP91, which can automatically scale non-anamorphic and full frame discs so that the TV's progressive scan inputs and FULL mode can be used all the time. A great feature.
     
  5. Jeff Kleist

    Jeff Kleist Executive Producer

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    You can get the anamorphic Canadian version of GWH that has 1 extra deleted scene
     
  6. Alex-C

    Alex-C Screenwriter

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    Okay.
    Thanks everyone.

    I thought it had something to do with being non-anamorphic.
     
  7. John_Berger

    John_Berger Cinematographer

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  8. DaViD Boulet

    DaViD Boulet Lead Actor

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    That's why I got the Panny RP91. It allows one to scale non-anamrophic widescreen movies to be properly displayed on 16x9 TVs that "lock" into 16x9 mode with 480P input.

    Sounds like you're saying your set can still, however, modify aspect ratio even with 480P intput. That's unusual (only a few HDTVs out there let you do that). In this case you need a "zoom" mode or something that would "blow up" a 4x3 lbxed picture to properly fill the screen.

    -dave
     
  9. GlennH

    GlennH Cinematographer

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  10. DaViD Boulet

    DaViD Boulet Lead Actor

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    Alex,

    if your Mits doesn't allow for aspect ratio control with 480P input then just switch to interlaced (either component or S-video) when watching non-anamrophic discs.
     

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