New theater construction, Lets talk studs!

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Wes, Feb 24, 2001.

  1. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 1997
    Messages:
    1,190
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Utah USA
    Real Name:
    Wes Peterson
    My instincts tell me wood studs would be the way to go acoustically but steel are cheaper and keep pulling at my wallet strings. Tell me why steel would be bad for my dedicated theater.
    And also I have been thinking about using 1/2" sheet rock with a 1/2" sound board but a guy at Home Depot says double sheet rock would be best. What do you think, Sheet rock is cheaper. There I go pinching pennies again. Perhaps I shouldn't have pulled $2500 from the theater money to go to Cancun! [​IMG]
    Wes
     
  2. Mark McCanna

    Mark McCanna Auditioning

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2001
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wes, I'd like to add on to your thread, I'm interested in knowing what is best for finishing the ceiling, sheetrock (gyprock) or suspended tiles.
    Many thanks, Mark
     
  3. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2000
    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    0
    I finally found my copy of Owens Corning's "Noise Control Design Guide". I recommend you both order one if you're serious about getting the most for your $$/labor.
    Steel is considerably better since it dissipates HF quicker. Their comparisons of various constructions shows thicker walls do better, as to be expected. Recording studio mixing rooms typically have walls constructed of two sheets of 3/4" MDF laminated together.
    WRT ceilings, construct them like the walls, as acoustic tiles, even with batting on top will not be as good, and sound takes the path of least resistance.
    GM
    ------------------
    Loud is beautiful, if it's clean
     
  4. CRyan

    CRyan Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 1999
    Messages:
    1,239
    Likes Received:
    0
    I would second the comment about staying away from ceiling tiles. Some people use them with no problems, but you could have a mess on your hands if they do start vibrating.
    C. Ryan
     
  5. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2000
    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    0
    >Since they will not actually be in the room, it does not matter if the do better at dispersing high frequencies.
    ====
    Not so. They are part of an energy attenuating 'system'. This is borne out by the fact that wall systems using steel studs have a higher STC rating than those using wood.
    GM
    ------------------
    Loud is beautiful, if it's clean
     
  6. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2000
    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sound Transmission Class. I'm not in construction either, but I do at least read up on a subject before I dispense advice if needed; though in this case, energy dissipation in a room wall, etc., is no different than a speaker/sub cab. If you know the physics of one, you can extrapolate for the other.
    Anyway, get the booklet, it explains it all in layman's terms. If you want to cut down pipe/ventilation noise, get their "Insulations for Mechanical Systems" too.
    GM
    ------------------
    Loud is beautiful, if it's clean
     
  7. Aaron Plaza

    Aaron Plaza Auditioning

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2001
    Messages:
    11
    Likes Received:
    0
    I plan to build a double wall system. Build your first wall with either type of stud. Fill with fibergalss insulation. Then build a second wall with a 1 inch gap from the first. Be sure that the two walls do not touch. Fill this wall with polystyrene insulation. The two different types of insulation are supposed to cancel noise differently. I plan on using fiberglass for both. Be sure that both walls are sealed so that there are no air leaks for sound to travel through. The first wall will still resonate, but the dead air space and the second wall will greatly muffle any sound that persists.
     
  8. LarrySkelly

    LarrySkelly Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2001
    Messages:
    129
    Likes Received:
    0
    Here is a more economical double wall system. It may even work better than the one described above. Forget where I read about this. Unfortunately I did not know this when I built my room.
    Build your wall with a 2 x 6 sill plate and top plate, but use 2 x 4 studs. Run your studs on 12" centers. However alternate the side of the 2 x 6 that every other stud is on. So, looking along the length of the wall, studs 1, 3, 5 etc are on the left side of the sill plate, and studs 2, 4, 6 etc are on the right.
    Then weave normal fiberglass insulation, or acoustic insulation between the alternating studs.
    Studs are on 12" centers sp that every other stud matches a 4' sheet of drywall.
    This wall insulates very well because the inside and outside walls are not touching each other at all, save for the sill plate and top plate.
     
  9. StephenL

    StephenL Second Unit

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2000
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    0
  10. Greg Monfort

    Greg Monfort Supporting Actor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2000
    Messages:
    884
    Likes Received:
    0
    No experience in a room's construction, but it's fundamentally no different than a large speaker cab WRT attenuation. I tried it several years ago in some 40ft^3 cabs, and I had to rip it out as it did such a poor job, so I won't use it for rooms. Two layers of 5/8" drywall (which is what my room has) is probably better than a layer of each, as recommended.
    GM
    ------------------
    Loud is beautiful, if it's clean
     
  11. Curtis Lotter

    Curtis Lotter Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 1999
    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    0
    The local newspaper runs a column from James Dulley. Every once in a while he will cover the subject of sound transmission. The column in the paper gives some good general ideas, but you can also write him and he will send a very detailed paper on the different methods to reduce sound transmission. I wrote to him several years ago and used one of the methods with excellent results.
    Some of the methods were already mentioned, and although the guide I recieved doesn't mention the use of steel studs, it does have the STC ratings for many of the wood stud walls.
    According to this guide, following are some of the STC ratings...
    STC 34, the standard interior wall most of us already have: 2x4 studs, 16" O.C., 1/2" drywall screwed both sides.
    STC 45, same wall, but with a 1/2" layer of soundboard under each layer of drywall.
    STC 50, 2x4 studs 16" O.C., 1/2" drywall 1 side, 1 1/2" fiberglass insulation between studs, resilient channels with 1/2" drywall on opposite side.
    STC 59, same wall as STC 50 but with 2 layers drywall on 1 side, and resilient channels with 2 layers of drywall on the opposite side, they also replace the fiberglass with 2" mineral wool.
    STC 60, you would be building 2 separate walls. 2x3 studs and top and bottom plates, (why he chooses 2x3 studs, I have no idea) 1/2" drywall 1 side. The second wall would be spaced 2" to 8" apart from the first, with 2" mineral wool placed in that space. The 2nd. wall would be constructed the same as the first. This is very similar to what Aaron Plaza and LarrySkelly described.
    When I built my room I used the "STC 59" method. If you're not familiar with resilient channels, they're thin metal strips that you screw across (perpendicular to) your studs. You then screw your drywall to the channels. The channels separate the drywall from the studs.(a -not great- example would be if you cut a piece of cardboard and looked at the edge of the cardboard you would see how the 2 outside layers of paper are separated by the inner "weave" of paper) Anyway, the channels work great, are easy to use, fairly cheap, and can also be used the same way for your ceiling.
    With the exterior type glass door I used for my room, I get an honest 20 decible reduction in noise when I walk out and close the door. If anyone else has a Yamaha reciever thats exactly what you get when you hit your mute button!
    If anybody else is interested in this guide, you can get it by writing to:
    James Dulley, 6906 Royalgreen Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio 45244.
    This address is a few years old so I'll keep checking the daily paper to see if it's still current.
    Good luck!
    Curt
     
  12. Timmy

    Timmy Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 1998
    Messages:
    160
    Likes Received:
    0
     

Share This Page