New Display? Basic Calibrations Just do it. Don't Wait

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Guy Kuo, Jan 27, 2002.

  1. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    I'm reposting this as it applies to more than the original thread.

    There is NO reason to wait for a set to "age" before doing the basic video adjustments like those in AVIA, Home Theater Tune-Up, or VE. Doing that right away will help get the display down to safe contrast levels. Jut remember to redo things after 50 and 100 hours of operation as the tubes will change dramatically during that time. The reason that "calibration" is not recommended until after about 100 hours has to do with professional grayscale alignment. Actually, that could be done immediately. It won't harm the display, but the reason for waiting is economic. The initial rapid change of the tubes light output would quickly cause a grayscale calibration to drift severely in the first 100 hours or so of operation. Nobody wants to play for another grayscale calibration so we generally have people wait until the tubes have aged enough that the drift over time has slowed enough that a calibration will hold true for a year or so. Also, that time lets you get a chance to get past infant mortality. You don't want to play for a pro geometry and grayscale calibration only to have a set die shortly therafter from other unrelated causes.

    Somehow the idea of waiting to do a professional grayscale and geometry calibration has been corrupted into the oft repeated and incorrect advice to wait before doing the basic video adjustments. This isn't quite urban legend, but just ill advice based inappropriately generalizing an idea.

    Basic Video Adjustments on a new display --- Just do it.

    And yes, I did mean to say a year or so on professional grayscale calibration. They drift over time as the tubes age so having a pro come out every year or so and retouch the grayscale to keep it really tuned in is quite reasoanble. If that is all that is done, the charge shouldn't be too excessive to keep the display tuned.
     
  2. Jeff O.

    Jeff O. Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks Guy,

    I must admit I have fallen into that category. I was waiting for break in of my new 50HX81 before I do the calibrations with Avia. I just reduced contrast and brightness and calibrated by eye for the time being. But, I have a couple of questions. In another thread it was mentioned that the calibration should be done for each input. Using Avia or VE or whatever, this is difficult since my DVD player is hooked up through component and my Sat receiver and VCR through another S-video input. Would it be worthwhile to calibrate the S-video input using the S-Vid output on my DVD player also, or is this a waste of time. Also it was suggested to calibrate the inputs with the picture in the Full mode. Should I use the Full mode when doing the calibrations?

    By the way, thanks for all the great information (and humor sometimes) you provide on this and other forums.

    Jeff
     
  3. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    I would calibrate with the screen set to fill the screen area as you would be using during viewing. Changes in the amount of screen aread being scanned can alter the beam energy/area. People sometimes forget this and keep contrast the same for anamorphic (vertical squeeze) as for 4:3. The screen area drops so you must drop contrast to keep wear on the phosphor constant. On a widescreen display, the situation is reversed. Just remember that the smaller scan area often means that contrast should be set lower. Doing the calibrations in the viewing mode gets it right for each viewing situation.

    The s-video can be calibrated if you temporarily connect the s-video output of the DVD player to those inputs. However, you are right in worrying that source devices won't quite match NTSC standard and your calibration while correct won't look right with bad signal sources. I've wrestled with that in my own system - to the point of opening up machines and modifying them to get them closer to standard. That's not an option for most people so the best advice I'd give is to train your eyes to see what a good black and white level looks like on DVD. Then adjust the other inputs (showing the other sources) to make them mimic the DVD appearance as well as possible.
     
  4. Jeff O.

    Jeff O. Stunt Coordinator

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    Guy,

    Thanks for the information. Just to make sure that I understand. My TV is widescreen. The Avia disk (which I use) is 1.33, so if I calibrate in the full mode (stretches 1.33, but fills screen with 1.85 widescreen) the contrast should be set slightly lower than the calibration with the Avia DVD when playing anamorphic disks?

    Thanks-Jeff
     
  5. Guy Kuo

    Guy Kuo Supporting Actor

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    The viewing mode which uses the least amount of screen area should end up with a lower contrast setting. If both modes use the same screen surface area (ie anamorphic DVD filling the widescreen and AVIA 4:3 streched horizontally to fill the widescreen) then the contrasts would end up the same.
     
  6. John_Bonner

    John_Bonner Supporting Actor

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    Excuse my ignorance but each "input" should be calibrated?

    I have calibrated my 36" WEGA (hooked up via component input) with AVIA. I assumed calibrating meant that once the adjustments were made, the tv itself was "calibrated" not just the component input. Am I wrong in this thinking?
     
  7. Peter Apruzzese

    Peter Apruzzese Producer

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    Guy:

    I recently received my new Studio Experience 13HD/Sanyo PLV60HT 16x9 LCD projector and have a couple of questions about calibrating it. I have the Avia disc on-hand but haven't fully explored it yet. Are there any specific tests on the disc for LCD projectors, especially regarding grey scale? I'm assuming the filter supplied should work with a projector and know that I should calibrate on the actual screen surface that I am planning on installing.

    Thanks,

    Pete
     
  8. Jay Mitchosky

    Jay Mitchosky Producer

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    Guy

    Thanks as always for your thoughtful and useful advice.

     
  9. Peter Apruzzese

    Peter Apruzzese Producer

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    Thanks, Jay, I'll check it out.
     

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