New Digital Video Format Makes Inroad in Hollywood (D-VHS)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by davepr, Jan 30, 2002.

  1. davepr

    davepr Stunt Coordinator

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  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

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  3. Ken Smith

    Ken Smith Stunt Coordinator

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    The next thing will be HD DVD. Why pay $1500.00 for an already obsolete format? Once HD DVD copyright protection is finalized it should take off. The tech. is already here, it just has to be made more affordable.
     
  4. JohnnyG

    JohnnyG Screenwriter

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    Ken, unless you've got a blue-spectrum laser diode that'll last 10,000 hours or so in your pocket, then no, the technology is not here yet!
     
  5. Sean M

    Sean M Stunt Coordinator

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    FMD and better encoding schemes than MPEG-2 are a reality today, and they don't require a blue laser. If you want MPEG-2 encoded discs that look exactly like DVD, then yes, you'll need a blue laser. MPEG-4 has a mode to do 1920 x 1080 and will fit on existing DVD's and Microsoft has presented a version of its Windows Media codec to the DVD forum in Japan for consideration as they work out HD-DVD standards. Personally, I hope MPEG-4 as I don't want anything to do with Microsoft and my movie watching.
     
  6. Michael R Price

    Michael R Price Screenwriter

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    I've seen MPEG-4 encoded videos at various bitrates and I was not impressed with the quality. I'd rather wait another year and have low-compression 1920x1080 (with some new exotic disk type like FMD with a blue laser). To me it doesn't matter if it's MPEG-2, WMF or some superhigh-bitrate MPEG-4. I just think it's better to wait a bit and have a truly better standard for video quality. (And other stuff like possibly uncompressed sound, or both OAR and pan/scan on one disk, etc.)
     
  7. JohnnyG

    JohnnyG Screenwriter

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  8. Sean M

    Sean M Stunt Coordinator

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    Johnny, by reality today, I meant that the technology is ready to be implemented in any product they choose to use it for. It's actually been a couple years, if memory serves, since the format was developed, and it will run on the current generation of lasers and is backward compatible with DVD. Blue Lasers are still a couple of years from being made practical to use in consumer applications, let alone affordable for most of the peopl on this forum. Not to mention that a new generation of lasers reading the discs will lead to an entirely new generation of encoding lasers and processes, which will drive up disc costs.
    I haven't seen MPEG-4 implemented in a professional environment, but you can find examples of it on the net used to encode DVD movies to CD since the codec is so efficient.
    Here's a story on newer codecs that was posted by Chris Dallas over at www.avsforum.com http://www.eetimes.com/story/OEG20011212S0060
    You might want to check out his thread as well http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=113044
    And, also coutesy Chris Dallas, a primer on FMD http://www.constellation3d.com/tech_frameset.html
    There are better options than Blue Lasers and D-VHS for HD-movies. I just hope we see them sooner rather than later, if at all.
     
  9. Westly T

    Westly T Second Unit

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    Last Sunday I passed on a JVC D-VHS Dish recorder for $75! I just don't have an interest in tapes; hard to believe they are trying the same game with HDTV. $1500 today, $75 tomorrow, I think I'll pass! I vote to wait till the disk version comes out. But this is coming form someone who is also waiting on getting a HDTV tuner... And I've never liked tapes. I think I owned about 5 professional cassette tapes(I did have copies),(100's of CD's) 3 or 4 VHS movies,(about 75 LD's, currently in the 100's of DVD's) and I had a RCA SelectaVision VideoDisk player before a VCR (movie is on a record like media with groves and played with optical & and actual needle. It’s about the size of a record and completely enclosed in a plastic cover. The player spits the cover out after you load the movie so you never see the disk-record). I remember paying a fortune for an early Pioneer car stereo that played CD's. I have several MiniDisk players and a changer in my car, but no DAT.
     

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