New Construction - Rookie questions

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Brian--P, Aug 5, 2001.

  1. Brian--P

    Brian--P Auditioning

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    We are in the midst of building our first house and had a few simple questions on a pre-wire. As far as speaker wire, I was thinking of either going w/ 14g or 16g, but can I run standard speaker wire or does it have to be UL(?) rated? Does this depend on code? I don't want to cause any problems w/ the electricians or the inspection. (Our sales rep @ the subdivision mentioned that we should probably run the wire AFTER the inspection but BEFORE the insulation and drywall are installed. However, I would only have 1/2 day to do it and I would rather run the wire at my own leisure and take my time to do a better job.)
    We are planning on going w/ Paradigm in-walls for the front and in-ceilings for the rear. Since we only have a width of around 8 ft. to work with, what would you recommend as the space between the front speakers? Should the width between the rears be approximately the same? What about height for the fronts?
    Any help would be appreciated!!
     
  2. JerryHatchett

    JerryHatchett Stunt Coordinator

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    I have a big wide room but have found that a distance of about 10' apart on my front mains provides my best listening experience.
    Ideally, you want to put the tweeters as close to ear level as possible since highs don't "fan out" as well as the lower frequencies.
    The advice you have on when to run the wire is probably best. I've heard of owners running speaker wire and then the house not passing inspection. I'm sick to death of regulation like this, but that's another story. Pre-wiring is not a tough job; have a good drill on hand, stay away from electrical and phone wiring. You can do a lot of wire-pulling in a studded-up room in a half-day. Also be sure to run whatever wire you think you might use one day. Pre-wiring is a breeze and doesn't cost much money at all in the big scheme of things. Post-wiring can be a nightmare.
    Some folks will prefer twelve gauge wire even in walls, but for my own use I've had no trouble at all with fourteen gauge. When I build a new home, I'm gonna string everything necessary to implement any kind of home automation features in the future, as well.
    Jerry
     
  3. ace peterson

    ace peterson Second Unit

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    Yeah, I would use 12 gauge, too. I don't know why your speaker wire wouldn't pass inspection. It doesn't carry heavy current for appliances or anything. I would just get the Home Depot spool of speaker wire and then run it at your liesure.
    My thoughts,
    Ace
     
  4. Bill Lucas

    Bill Lucas Supporting Actor

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    Check the building code requirements in your area. You may be required to run speaker wire that is rated for in-wall installations. I'd run 16/4 if I were you. You can twist two together for an effective gauge of 13. If you do it haphazardly without checking local codes you could be in for problems. Congratulations and good luck in your new home.
     
  5. Bill Catherall

    Bill Catherall Screenwriter

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    Running speaker wire that is rated for in-wall has nothing to do with the voltage of the signal. It's because standard speaker wire can act as a path for fire to be carried through the wall. If code requires it in your area, I'd make sure to do it right.
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    Bill [​IMG]
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