New BBFC website gives deeper info UK censorship

Discussion in 'DVD' started by Mark_Mc, May 30, 2005.

  1. Mark_Mc

    Mark_Mc Agent

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    Many may have already stumbled across this little gem, but I'm posting this link for those that haven't.

    The BBFC (British Board of Film Classification) have launched a new website, aimed primarily at media studies students, but available to all, which gives much greater detail into some of the work carried out by the board, including case studies of the classification of various famous and infamous movies, a study on the 1980s 'Video Nasty' controversy and various other articles.

    I have no connection to the BBFC, and I'm certainly no apologist for them - in fact I think many of there decisions have been downright outrageous, not to mention baffling - but this site does at least give one a new appreciation of the process by which they arrive at the rating given to a film, from new releases like Batman Begins to older controversial releases like Crash and A Clockwork Orange.

    For anyone interested in censorship, it's well worth a look. I can't say it's changed my overall opinion of the organisation, but there is some fascinating 'well I never knew that' material to be found.
     
  2. Mark Oates

    Mark Oates Supporting Actor

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    Fascinating reading. It makes you realise their often curious behaviour has nothing to do with the mentalities of the board itself, but the half-assed legislation behind the organisation's remit.

    I always knew the Video Recordings Act 1984 was a typically ill-conceived, knee-jerk piece of legislation, but I'd never appreciated how dangerous a piece of legislation the Criminal Justice & Public Order Act 1994 was.

    I mean, today they use it against obscenity but as long as it's on the statute book there's always the possibility some kindly soul could use it to protect the public from dangerous philosophies or beliefs.
     
  3. Mark_Mc

    Mark_Mc Agent

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    For anyone interested in Britain's history of film censorship, I can recommend Censored by Tom Dewe Mathews and The Seduction of the Gullible: Curious History of the British "Video Nasties" Phenomenon by John Martin as essential reading.

    While both are now out of date in that many of the films discussed have now been given uncut DVD releases, they both offer a superb insight into not only the films themselves, but the thought processes behind the banning and/or cutting of the various movies under discussion, but also the frankly nauseating way the British tabloid 'newspapers' whipped up public hysteria in an often obscenely hypocrytical campaign against some releases(hence the 'Seduction of The Gullible' title of the second book).

    Both books are a little hard to find, but worth searching for.
     

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