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Networking (Mac) Question

Discussion in 'Apple' started by Pamela, Apr 21, 2003.

  1. Pamela

    Pamela Supporting Actor

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    At work, my department uses Macs. The rest of the hospital is PC. IS refuses to network us with the rest of the hospital, so my Internet connection is dial-up. We have our own local Mac network for the computers and printers.

    I recently found out that by running the Ethernet cable into the hospital network port, I can access their T1 connection for internet. This is great because it is much faster than my dial-up. Problem is, if I'm hooked into the hospital network, I can't hook into our local network to print. I bought a Ethernet hub thinking that was the solution. I think I need a twisted pair cable to access get an internet connection through the Ethernet hub. No problem. But I realized I only have one uplink on the hub, but I have two separate networks I have to access. Don't I need two uplinks?

    Do I daisy chain two hubs? Can I uses an Ethernet/usb adapter for a second Ethernet port on the computer? I can't ask IS because they won't have anything to do with our Mac stuff. Nor do I really want them to. There's got to be a solution.

    Also, I can't access my Earthlink email when connected to the hospital network. I can download files from FTP sites, etc., but can only access my email through WebMail. Is this a firewall issue?

    Many thanks for any insight!
     
  2. Matt DeVillier

    Matt DeVillier Supporting Actor

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    Pamela,

    all you should need is a second ethernet interface (PCI or USB,the former being preferred). Shouldn't need to mess with any hubs. Assuming you are running OS 9.x or later, everything will be fine.

    For the email, they may have blocked the port for pop email, but most likely it's just a configuration issue (do you have the right pop server set?). Any decent IS deparatment would be able to tell you if that's the case, regardless of the OS you are running. If not, you need new IS guys =P
     
  3. Michael*K

    Michael*K Screenwriter

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    The best way to do this is the way Matt describes...get a PCI-based Ethernet card to supplement your built-in port. We do this at work on several machines with external (outside our firewall) connections that we need networked printer access for. You didn't say what kind of machines you have, but if it's one of the PowerMac models, the door just drops down and you pop the card into one of the slots and secure it with a screw. It's a cinch.

    As for the mail, your Network administrator likely has POP access blocked.
     
  4. Pamela

    Pamela Supporting Actor

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    Thanks Matt & Michael!

    A PCI card it is. Is there a particular brand recommended?
     
  5. Matt DeVillier

    Matt DeVillier Supporting Actor

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    I picked up a cheap MacSense 10/100 card from one of the warehouse stores for $30 or so, which uses one a RealTec chip. No complaints with it.
     
  6. Patrick Larkin

    Patrick Larkin Screenwriter

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    Pamela -

    How is your current Mac network set up? Are they all connected via ethernet? Why not plug all the machines into the "hospital network ports" including the printer? Then, they'd all have internet access and you could use the existing hospital wiring infrastructure to keep your Macs talking.

    After you have it set up, you can invite down your IT people and make then feel like morons. [​IMG]
     
  7. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

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    What Matt explained will fix your immediate problem but are you just causing yourself more pain?

     
  8. Mike Sogge

    Mike Sogge Stunt Coordinator

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    Depending upon how your department is wired you could get a router and switch, hook your department computer to them, and then uplink to the hospital's network. This would put your department on the same subnet allowing you to share while utilizing the hospital's T1 to the outside.

    I don't know how Earthlink functions, but they may have it set up on their end that only computers in their IP range have access to their POP servers. I know that my ISP at home functions that way and only allows outside mail access via their WebMail frontend.
     
  9. Pamela

    Pamela Supporting Actor

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  10. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

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  11. Mark Brewer

    Mark Brewer Stunt Coordinator

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    Would being on the hospital network be an advantage to others in your department???
    Does not being on the network affect your ability to communicate with other parts of the hospital???

    Are there other department who would like to communicate with your department over the network???

    If the answers are yes..
    I would prepare a formal proposal to put your department on the network. Show the cost and benefits.

    Because the outsourced IT department does not like Macs is no reason not be on the network.
    _____________

    Get allies, but not in subversive way, work with the IT people...
     
  12. Patrick Larkin

    Patrick Larkin Screenwriter

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  13. KyleS

    KyleS Screenwriter

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    Joseph S Cinematographer

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  15. David Lawson

    David Lawson Screenwriter

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    [begin frustration] It's a Mac, not a MAC! [/end frustration] [​IMG]
     
  16. Patrick Larkin

    Patrick Larkin Screenwriter

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    MAC in this sense is correct. He was talking about a "Media Access Control" address not a Macintosh address.
     
  17. Pamela

    Pamela Supporting Actor

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    Update:

    Thanks to all. I installed the PCI cards this morning, plugged into the networks and, voila! We're both hooked into our network, and the hospital's. I should clarify-we're not logging into their servers. Just "borrowing their T1." Found out in order to do so in the past, IS gave out passwords. They stopped that six months ago and allowed access without the password. It is a well guarded secret, however. Well, my boss is happy because now we can be "more productive!"

    And to address the point of a hospital using an outside vendor for their IS services, yeah it's dumb. We had our own department until about a year ago. We are part of a larger company and they signed a contract with Perot to provide service for all of the hospitals, so we had to do it. But it's awful. They're very selective in what they will and won't do. We have a few PCs in our department, so if we need anything, even a toner cartridge, we have to call Texas (from L.A.) It's a big mess, but the hospital had no choice. I share a PC with my co-worker for access to hospital email. It's in another room. Pain in the butt.

    P.S. We asked to be networked periodically for six years, and it was never addressed. I think we waited long enough! We would still like to officially be networked so we could have access to the mail server and the print shop's Canon Fiery, but they just won't budge.
     

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