Networking Help Needed.

Discussion in 'Computers' started by TerryHub, Jan 22, 2005.

  1. TerryHub

    TerryHub Stunt Coordinator

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    I need a little networking help with something that is going to drive me insane:

    I have had a wired network running for about a year and a half now. My network consists of 3 PCs and an Audiotron. My main PC is the one I use for everything (internet, gaming, music, etc.), it has my printer hooked to it via USB and I access the internet via dial-up modem on this computer (file and printer sharing is enabled). My second PC is my kids. My third PC is a little server box I put inside my entertainment stand. It has no mouse, keyboard, or monitor. I access the computer via a little program called Tight VNC from my main computer. The last device is my Audiotron. Everything is wired through two small hubs. All PCs access the internet through my shared internet connection on the main PC.

    The problem is that in both antisipation of getting DSL and my new Dell laptop with built in wireless networking, I purchased a Linksys WRT54G wireless router with four port hub.

    I installed the thing and got my network up and running normally as before. The problem is the laptop. I can get the wireless device to see my Linksys and the SSID that I'm using. I can see from the laptop that I have a shared internet connection. I cannot get the laptop to see my wired network and I cannot get my wired network to see my laptop. I think that I have tried everything. I am a fairly proficient computer user and to this point have never been unable to beat anything until now. What simple thing am I missing here?

    By the way, all PCs are running XP HOME and the laptop is running XP PRO. The wireless network is set with no security encription (for now).

    Can anyone help me?

    Thanks.
     
  2. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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    Just a swag ...

    Perhaps the firewall on the laptop is not allowing access to the I.P. addresses of the wired stuff. I once had a problem sharing a printer and found that a firewall was not set up to allow ALL I.P. addresses in my 'network' access.
     
  3. TerryHub

    TerryHub Stunt Coordinator

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    Nope...not it. I neglected to say that none of the computers have firewalls on. I thought that too.

    Thanks.
     
  4. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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    So, you turned off the firewall that gets installed by XP service pack 2 also ?

    Good luck
     
  5. Bob Friend

    Bob Friend Stunt Coordinator

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    How are your IP addresses assigned?
     
  6. TerryHub

    TerryHub Stunt Coordinator

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    LewB:

    Yes, all firewall protection is off including XP2.

    Bob:

    That is an interesting question. I used to use static IP addresses because I used to use my Pocket PC to operate my Audiotron. If I didn't have the host static, I would always have to check its IP address before I could access the Audiotron. I don't really use the Pocket PC anymore so I suppose I could use DHCP. The interesting thing regarding your question was that I remembered during the installation of the router, it asked my to turn on DHCP on the computer I was using. Therefore, my main PC is now DHCP with everything else still static. What were you thinking?

    Thanks.
     
  7. Sami Kallio

    Sami Kallio Screenwriter

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    You might want to turn all of them to use DHCP. If you want a specific IP for any of the items on that network, you can specify the DHCP server to assign it the same IP based on its MAC address. Check your DHCP server status for the MAC address.

    With the broadband connection, you might want to set up a router with firewall. Much better than the internet sharing option on Windows (I assume that's what you're using). I had a Linux server act as a firewall and router prior to getting a mandatory router from Verizon with their fiber connection.
     
  8. Bob Friend

    Bob Friend Stunt Coordinator

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    Sorry for the late reply. I was thinking that perhaps you had to DHCP servers running on your network and they were perhaps handing out address on 2 different subnets.
     
  9. Scott Merryfield

    Scott Merryfield Executive Producer

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    This is most likely your problem. Your router and PC using DHCP to obtain it's address will be on the same IP network, but unless by shear coincidence you assigned your other devices fixed addresses on the same subnet, your router will see those other devices as having invalid addresses and will not route their packets.

    The easiest solution is to use DHCP to obtain addresses for all devices on your network. If you have an application that requires a fixed IP address, then Sami's suggestion of using the DHCP service on your router to permanently assign an address based on the device's ethernet MAC address is an excellent solution.
     

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