Neo 6

Discussion in 'AV Receivers' started by Rob.melone, Mar 25, 2004.

  1. Rob.melone

    Rob.melone Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2003
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Does the "6" in Neo 6 imply all speakers in a 6.1 setup with the exception of the subwoofer? If true, can anyone explain the logic behind this format?
     
  2. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    5,110
  3. Rob.melone

    Rob.melone Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2003
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Yes Mike, I know. I am trying to find out if the .1 (subwoofer) is active or inactive in this mode. The sw icon is not actived on my system when using Neo: 6 Music or Movie while playing a stereo source.
     
  4. Michael Reuben

    Michael Reuben Studio Mogul

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 1998
    Messages:
    21,763
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    5,110

    And the quotation I provided specifically addresses that question. I'll put the relevant language in boldface.

    M.
     
  5. Rob.melone

    Rob.melone Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2003
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Specific for some! Are you saying I can setup my receiver to activate the sub while using Neo 6? Thanks anyway Mike, I will let this go.
     
  6. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 1999
    Messages:
    3,756
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Rob,

    You'll get the subwoofer working if you have your mains, center, and surrounds set as "small"--this is what is meant by

    "The “.1” subwoofer channel is generated by bass management in the preamp or receiver."

    Neo 6 does not have a specific subwoofer channel like Dolby Digital or DTS, so unless you use the bass management in your receiver or pre pro to route bass to the sub by setting other speakers to "Small" the sub will be inactive.

    I have a 7.1 receiver with all speakers set as small, and my subs work quite nicely when using stereo, DPL, DPL-II, and Neo 6.

    It's not a true .1 channel in that it's not a specific discrete LFE channel meant to reproduce earthquakes, but the audible effect is the same. When you set speakers to "small", all the bass below a certain frequency (called the crossover) is redirected from those channels to the sub. Some receivers let you adust the crossover point, some are fixed, usually at about 80hz.

    The THX spec is for all bass below 80hz to be redirected to the subwoofer.

    Your receiver display may not light up the .1 or sub indicator unless it's receiving a discrete LFE signal on a DD or DTS source, so you may have to get up close to the sub to see if it's active, but if the bass management is working correctly and you set the mains to "small" the sub should produce bass from non DD or DTS sources.
     
  7. Rob.melone

    Rob.melone Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2003
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Steve, Thank you for taking the time to explain bass management relative to different sound modes. It appears that there are similarities between a/v equipmet (hardware and software) and computers in that there is a great deal of technology built-in (that we pay for) that consumers are not using. I appreciate your assistance and look forward to experimenting with bass management technology.
     
  8. Steve Schaffer

    Steve Schaffer Producer

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 1999
    Messages:
    3,756
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Rob,

    I had the feeling that you might not be entirely familiar with the concept of bass management so took a chance, hope I didn't insult your intelligence as that certainly was not my intent.

    I don't know what sort of receiver or separates you're using, or what type of speakers you have, so it's hard to make specific recommendations. I'm also not familiar with some of the more obscure setup procedures on all makes of receivers or processors.

    Virtually all recievers or separate processors that can decode Dolby Digital and DTS have the ability to set speakers as either large or small. This doesn't refer to physical speaker size so much as the overall frequency range the speaker is capable of reproducing.

    "Large" in this context refers to a speaker capable of reproducing very low bass--all the way down to 20 or 30 hz--usually one with a largish woofer. "Small" refers to a speaker not capable of good bass response much below 80 to 100hz.

    As you know, a subwoofer is usually self-powered and is meant to reproduce only very low bass--typically frequencies below 100hz.

    An interesting fact is that the human ear is not capable of "localizing" really low frequency sounds, those at 80-100hz or lower, meaning you can't tell where these low sounds are coming from so it's not necessary for your speaker system to be able to distribute these frequencies all over the room as is the case for higher frequencies.

    So for really low bass sounds you only need one speaker, and the rest of the speakers don't have to be able to reproduce that really low bass.

    Even if you do have great big main speakers with nice 10 or 12" woofers in them, the power necessary to drive that low bass is very much more than what's required for the rest of the frequency range you're dealing with.

    So even with mains and centers capable of low bass, it's still a good idea to run them as small in order to reduce the power load on your reciever which will result in cleaner sound at high volume. Sending that low bass instead to the powered subwoofer which has it's own amplification and is specifically designed for earthquake and explosion effects thus becomes a good idea even if you have nice big floorstanding mains.

    You might need to drag out the owner's manual for your receiver to figure out how to set up the bass management.
    The individual volume level if each speaker also should be adjusted so it's the same at your listening position from each speaker, and distance adjustments can and should also be done. The specific procedure differs from receiver to reciever but they all provide for these adjustments.

    I'd also suggest you get a copy of the AVIA guide to home theater dvd and obtain a Radio Shack Sound Pressure Level meter. With these you can most accurately calibrate your speaker array to give the best sound. The AVIA disc has instructions on how to use the meter to make the level adjustments for each speaker. This is a total $70 or so investment but is the single most cost-effective $70 you can spend on your system.

    It's all a bit intimidating at first but after a little familiarization it actually gets to be a lot of fun.
     
  9. Rob.melone

    Rob.melone Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2003
    Messages:
    91
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    0
    Steve, thank's so much for taking the time to compose your response. It is helpful and appreciated! Rob
     

Share This Page