Neil Sedaka's Solitaire: What does it mean?

Discussion in 'Music' started by Kevin Porter, Mar 23, 2004.

  1. Kevin Porter

    Kevin Porter Supporting Actor

    Jan 10, 2002
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    I was listening to the new Clay Aiken version and was starting to think about the lyrics and was wondering what the story really means. This is my take on it. It's about these two people that fall in love but he doesn't express it enough to her so she leaves him. He's heartbroken and unmotivated to do anything and full of regret so he spends his days alone. Is that pretty much it or does anyone else have a different interpretation?
  2. John Watson

    John Watson Screenwriter

    Jul 14, 2002
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    From Neal Sedaka's own words about the song, on a Cd I have : "My most moving, introspective song. Inspired by my classical roots". (Don't Forget, he also did "Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen" [​IMG])

    BTW, the music on SOLITAIRE is performed in 1974 by a group soon to be known as 10cc.

    Your interpretation of the lyrics seems ok, though it could also be a bit more abstract, the loneliness of the artist?

    On the other hand, maybe it's a musical cue from the Covenant, that will soon unleash the evil of Marshall. [​IMG]
  3. Craig S

    Craig S Producer

    Mar 4, 2000
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    League City, Texas
    Real Name:
    Craig Seanor
    I think it's about a man who won't take chances & can't express his feelings, and retreats farther & farther into his shell. His life has become a game of solitaire. A cautionary tale, if you will.

    Neil Sedaka's a pretty good pop tunesmith (nothing wrong with songs like "Happy Birthday Sweet Sixteen", "Breaking Up Is Hard To Do", & "Calendar Girls" - all wonderfully catchy pop songs). It must be noted that the lyrics to most (if not all) of Sedaka's hits were by his longtime writing partner, the late Howard Greenfield. I think "Solitaire" shows the duo at the top of their craft.

    But the best version of the song, IMO, is by the Carpenters. Few vocalists could milk a sad song like Karen Carpenter, and her performance of "Solitaire" was one of her finest.

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