Need opinions please

Discussion in 'Playback Devices' started by James_Z, Oct 2, 2006.

  1. James_Z

    James_Z Agent

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    My home theater consists of a Pioneer VSX D812 receiver (110 w per ch), a Philips DVP 642 DVD player (one that plays divx, etc), Kenwood KS-401HT speakers (the 2 front spkrs on space taking stands), and a decent Sony 120 W 12" sub. I was thinking of selling it all on eBay (except maybe the sub), and buying this

    http://www.walmart.com/catalog/produ...uct_id=4910118

    I'm basically looking to save space (mainly with the speakers) and figure that the built in DVD player in this unit is basically the same one that I am using now. It says this unit puts out 250 W per ch. which is more than double of what I have now. I'm looking for opinions on which setup everyone will think is better and if I'll be losing sound quality by buying this system
     
  2. Jimi C

    Jimi C Screenwriter

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    Ok, any particular reason you want Phillips brand? If your going to get a Home theater in a box type setup I think Onkyo and Denon are your best bets.

    Other points -
    1)I think your going to be dissipointed by the amount of money your going to get on Ebay for your current gear. Nothing is very desirable and I think in the end shipping costs on things like the speakers are going to make them unsellable.

    2)Theres not a snowballs chance in hell that little thing puts out 250wpc. Theres $2,000 2 channel amps that dont produce that much power. It might manage 25 wpc.

    3)Yes its true that a built in dvd player will save space, however that means when the dvd player stops working, the whole thing is junk. I would suggest that having those 2 things seperate would be ideal.
     
  3. James_Z

    James_Z Agent

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    I chose the Philips brand because it seemed like a great deal. Like I said...it states 250w pr ch amd it's under $200. Not really worried about the a mount of money I'll get on ebay really.
    Anyway ..."25 wpc"??? How can they advertise 250 if its only really 25?
     
  4. Jimi C

    Jimi C Screenwriter

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    You will have to show me where you saw that written. I dont care if its written all over the unit in gold leaf though. Its not 250 wpc.

    Have you personally listened to it?

    Edit- I see it

    "System Power

    1000W (RMS) System
    250W (RMS) Front Speaker(s)
    250W (RMS) Center Speaker
    250W (RMS) Rear Speaker(s)
    250W (RMS) Subwoofer"

    Yea, thats just a flat out lie. Don't beleive it. Besides, watts dont have much to do with good sound. Maybe they forgot the decimal point.
     
  5. James_Z

    James_Z Agent

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    so you think the audio quality this unit puts out will be worse than what I already have? My speakers arent all that great but i have a pretty decent receiver.

    I'm actually looking to just save some space. I'm looking to get a decent set of speakers (pref the same size that come with the Philips model). Do you have any recommendations?
     
  6. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    Philips says that they're 3 ohm speakers. Furthermore, the satellite speakers are full range: only the centre speaker actually has a tweeter.

    Quite a few firms make small satellite speakers: Polk (though their crossovers are strange), Infinity, B&W, Orb Audio, the firm that shall not be named...
     
  7. James_Z

    James_Z Agent

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    I am not really knowledgable on speakers ... does this mean they are not good?
     
  8. JeremyErwin

    JeremyErwin Producer

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    Hmm. Typical speakers use multiple drivers to handle different frequencies. For instance, my speakers use a 6.5 inch midrange driver to produce sound from 48 Hz to 4000 Hz, and a tweeter to produce the highs: 4000 Hz to 42000 Hz). Anything lower is handled by the subwoofer.
    The speakers contain a circuit board known as a crossover that sends the highs to the tweeter, and the lows to the midrange.

    Cheaply made speakers use a single driver, and blurry sound can result. (It is possible to design a good, single driver speaker, but not inexpensively.) Conversely, a well designed multiple driver speaker can fill a room with sound, yet still allow the listener to identify where in space a particular sound is coming from.

    It is possible to inflate the Wattage specification of an amplifier by specifying a lower impedence.
    For instance, I have a 75 W receiver. That's into 8 ohms. The spec sheet also says that it has a dynamic power output of 160W (3 ohm). It's essentially meaningless. Halve the ohms, double the power (given sufficient current-- which the phillips will most probably not provide.)

    IIRC, the Pioneer is a pretty decent receiver. You should be able to find a
    set of satellite speakers that won't look too bulky, and would probably improve on your existing system.

    (*Those particular speakers have a frequency response of ~130Hz -- 20 kHz and are really intended for use with a matching subwoofer. They contain 3 inch midranges and 1 inch tweeters). Not really my cup of tea, but they don't take up that much space.
     

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