Need help with Network Interface Card...

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Adam C., Jan 30, 2003.

  1. Adam C.

    Adam C. Stunt Coordinator

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    I currently have a computer that is on the network here at college. I am getting a new computer next week. Can I just take out my current NIC and install in into the new computer? If so how do I go about doing this? Thanks for any help.
     
  2. Brian Ruth

    Brian Ruth Supporting Actor

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    Adam - you CAN take your current NIC out of your old computer and put it in your new one, but it would probably be preferable just to order one on your new computer instead. It will probably set you back about $10 dollars.

    I think it would be better than having to fuss with uninstalling drivers on your old computer.
     
  3. LewB

    LewB Screenwriter

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    Do you know that the new machine does not have a NIC (I'm assuming ethernet here) already built in ? That seems to be a very common feature lately.
     
  4. Chad Ellinger

    Chad Ellinger Second Unit

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    This should be a straightforward process, but you need to check a few things first.
    1. Does your new computer include an Ethernet card / port?
    2. Is your existing Ethernet card a PCI-based card?[/list=1]

      Regarding number 2, older computers sometimes have legacy (16-bit) expansion slots that use the ISA bus. Newer computers use a more efficient 32-bit PCI bus for expansion cards. The easiest way to tell if your NIC is ISA or PCI is to open up your computer, find your NIC, and look at the way it is oriented. If the chips on the card are facing up, it's an ISA card; if they're facing down, it's PCI. If you have an ISA card, you'll want to pick up a PCI-based NIC for your new computer.

      Assuming you have a PCI-based NIC, follow these steps to transfer the card to the new machine.
      1. Find out the make/model of your NIC. You can do this by looking at the card itself or (in Windows 9x) by going to Control Panel, clicking System and going to Device Manager. This should list all of the hardware on your PC.
      2. Go online and track down the latest drivers for the card. Download these, unzip them and burn them to a CD (or copy them to a floppy). You may not need these, but its good to have them in case your new computer does not have pre-installed drivers for your NIC.
      3. Make sure your computer is turned off and that the power cord is unplugged. Open up your case and locate your network card. Use a screwdriver to remove the screw that attaches the card to the back of the case. Carefully remove the card from the motherboard with two hands.
      4. Open up your new computer (again, make sure it is turned off and the power cord disconnected). Find an empty PCI slot. Use a screwdriver to remove the screw for the metal plate that covers the opening for the slot in the back of the case. Line up the card in the slot and firmly push it evenly into the motherboard. Use the screw you just removed to attach the metal plate of the card to the back of the case.
      5. Plug the new computer back in and boot up. Windows should find the new hardware automatically and prompt you for your Windows CD. You may need to use the drivers that you downloaded earlier.[/list=1]

        Let us know how it goes!
     
  5. Adam C.

    Adam C. Stunt Coordinator

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    I my "new" computer is actually used (my father is giving it to me, so I cannot just order it with one.)

    I looked throught control panel and this is my NIC:

    3Com EtherLink 10/100 PCI TX NIC (3C905B-TX)

    By the way the computer I am taking it out of is my 333 Celeron[​IMG]
     
  6. Chad Ellinger

    Chad Ellinger Second Unit

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    Ok, that's definitely a PCI card then.

    You can download the drivers here. You should just need to download the 3c90x1.exe file and extract the files to a floppy disk. Then follow instructions 3-5 above.

    Good luck!
     
  7. Adam C.

    Adam C. Stunt Coordinator

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    thanks for your help, I'll let you know if it works when I pick my new computer tomorrow.
     
  8. Adam C.

    Adam C. Stunt Coordinator

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    Ok, I got the case open and I honestly am not exactly sure what it is. It is the part that is where is plug in my network cable correct? I just need to unscrew it and pull it out?
     
  9. DonRoeber

    DonRoeber Screenwriter

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    Pretty much, yeah. Might be wise to put a slot cover plate in it's place. Be sure the PC is off first, of course (I once overheard a salesguy at EB telling someone to install a PCI card with the system up and running, so that Windows would see it. Windows would see it alright, and all of the sparks!).
     
  10. Adam C.

    Adam C. Stunt Coordinator

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    thanks guys. As of now it is working.
     

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