Need Help with my TV again !

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Giorgio, Apr 4, 2002.

  1. Giorgio

    Giorgio Auditioning

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    Hello Everybody ,

    I need help setting up my Samsung 20" TXL2091F Dynaflat TV again . The big problem on this set is the contrast starts to bloom at around 51 / 100 and if I watch the tv at that number the screen is just too dark and makes DVDs unwatchable . As of today I have the contrast at about 65 to 70 out of 100 , although the tv still blooms it really is not all that bad it just curves a bit when there is a really bright sceen on a DVD . I have used a Hometheater set-up disk by Diskwasher Digital called The Ultimate DVD which did help some but not enough .Also , I like using the 16:9 vertical squeeze mode on this set and I would like to know if keeping the contrast at 65 /100 will damage the TV . I am using top of the line component cables by Monster and a Pioneer Dv-343 DVD player . Please if anyone knows the correct settings for this tv which would not damage it please help . Here are my setting for this tv :

    Contrast : 65 /100

    Brightness :50/100

    Color :30/100

    Tint : 70 /30

    Color Tone : normal
     
  2. Giorgio

    Giorgio Auditioning

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    Oh , I forgot to mention my sharpness is 50 /100 .
     
  3. DenR

    DenR Auditioning

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    A decently engineered consumer CRT directview should be able to produce about 30 foot-Lamberts of luminance without blooming or distorting the geometry. Some will do more, some less. That's plenty in a dimly lit room with little or no light reflecting off the screen, and some light behind the set to bias your eyes correctly. But, it just isn't very much light compared to the 50, 100 and even 150 (!) foot-Lamberts these sets are "designed" to produce in brightly lit environments.

    Another likely problem - your set may be producing way too much blue, that is, the set may be running too high a color temperature. The correct temp is 6500 Kelvins; lowering the temp to that level will make less energy demands on the set and usually give you a more linear picture in many ways. This can be accomplished by a pro calibration.

    It takes a good bit of getting used to the new look and adjusting the lighting in your viewing environment accordingly.

    Just remember, when your set isn't producing all that extra light, it actually has a chance of producing a much more detailed, accurate picture with much better black level performance. Think about the way movies look at the theater - that is what our CRT-based system was originally designed to emulate. When you're at the cinema, you are only getting 11 or 12 foot-Lamberts at best.
     

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