Need Help With Coax on TV

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Tim Campbell, Mar 26, 2002.

  1. Tim Campbell

    Tim Campbell Agent

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    I need to know if anyone has any knowledge of Coax connections in the backs of TV's?

    Mine is very loose. The picture shrinks from the top edge and it gets a little snowy. We only have an antena on it so I thought it was that. I hooked up my VCR to it and it did the same thing. This is just a crappy 19" tv that is a spare so I would like to try to open it up and fix the connection. Any suggestions?
     
  2. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    If you wiggle the coax and the picture does not change, the loose coax is probably not the reason for the snow and shrunken picture.
    If you remove the coax plug and look down at the stud, the actual contact is seen just inside the center hole on the stud. If the two metal fins, or lips, inside have separated so a paper clip slides in and out easily, it is almost impossible to fix.
    You can bend the pin inside the coax plug slightly and hope (not sure fire) that it then presses against one of the metal fins inside the jack better.
    You can take the back off the TV and replace the entire coax jack.
    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  3. Tim Campbell

    Tim Campbell Agent

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    Thank you for the info Allan!! The plug is loose and the picture does get better with Jiggling. Can I got to the Shack and get a plug to replace it?
     
  4. JohnDPug

    JohnDPug Extra

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    Before you head off to the Shack for a coax terminator, you should know which grade of coaxial cable you have. It's not always apparent. Trace the coax back as far as you can until you see a marking on the cable jacket. It may or may not indicate the cable grade (ie RG-59, RG-6, etc.). My Belkin cable had a product number which I was able to trace on their web site. If you don't want to go through this headache, you should buy a couple of each connector. If you use a RG-6 connector on a RG-59 cable, you'll never get a solid termination.

    I would suggest using the self tapping screw on connectors so you don't have to get a crimping tool. Once you strip the center conductor and the outer sheath the proper amount, you just "screw" the connector on with no need to crimp.

    I had some other wiring work to do so I bought a crimper/stripper from Sears and a bunch of crimp and screw on connectors. For the odd termination job, I like the Sears crimper because it has a template right on it for making the correct strip lengths and I've never made a bad connection with it although it's far from a professional crimping tool which was prohibitively expensive for me.
     
  5. Jack Briggs

    Jack Briggs Executive Producer

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    Listen: Though this fix is relatively simple, please be extremely careful when taking the cover off of a TV chassis. Even unplugged, there are very dangerous voltage levels still present.
     
  6. Jerry Wright

    Jerry Wright Agent

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    Tim, here's a quick fix I did on my 32" phillips with the exact same problem. I removed the set back after removing the coax input nut. The input is a push on connection to the chassis. Using a twisting motion I pulled the connection free. Then heating a sewing needle in a pair of pliers I made a small hole in the white insulating nylon on each side of the small hole for the center conductor. The holes are made on the flat sides of the pinch connectors. Then using a new needle, (the first was softened by the heat) I pryed the contacts together until they were touching and were centered in the hole. Worked like new. This problem is usually caused by all the wiggling try to get the threads started while connecting your coax. The whole job took about 15 minutes.
     
  7. Tim Campbell

    Tim Campbell Agent

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    Thanks guys! There is no nut around the coax, it is just popping out of the case. WHen I open the case I should be able to unscrew a bolt on the Coax make connecter?
     
  8. Bill Will

    Bill Will Screenwriter

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    If there is no nut around the shaft that's why it's probably loose & wiggles around. I had the same problem with a set that somebody gave me & all I did was install a new nut & then twist the coaxial shaft to where the picture was ok & then tightened the nut. Never did get around to replacing that connector though because the set gave out about a year later. I know, I know, a year & never got back to it. [​IMG]
     

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