Need help setting up a dual OS

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Jeff, Jun 12, 2002.

  1. Jeff

    Jeff Supporting Actor

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    I'm currently running Windows 98 and I want to go to XP but I'm not ready to give up '98 just yet so since I have two 40 gig hard drives, I've thought about putting XP on the 2nd one (drive D). I know XP has a menu at bootup that lets you select between the two, but will it work if XP is on drive D?


    Thanks,

    Jeff
     
  2. Graeme Clark

    Graeme Clark Cinematographer

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    Yup, I have a similar setup now.
     
  3. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    Setting up a dual-boot with 2000 or XP when you already have Windows 95 or 98 on the system is dead easy.

    You will need put XP onto a different partition from where 98 resides. That partition can be on a separate physical drive, it's up to you. It is possible to install XP onto the same partition as 98, but it can be troublesome and means you can't use the NTFS file system. Even Microsoft don't recommend it.

    The first thing you need to do is to decide where to put XP and to configure the partitions accordingly. When you're ready to install, boot into 98 and insert the XP CD. When you begin to install, choose the new installation option. Do not choose 'upgrade' because it'll overwrite your 98 installation.

    You need to be a bit careful here. Somewhere on the first few install screens there is an 'Advanced' button. Click on it and tick the box that says "Ask me which parititon to use" (or words to that effect). If you don't enable this option, XP will install to C: which is what you want to avoid.

    At some point the installation procedure will bring up a screen showing your current drives. This is where you tell XP where to put itself. You can create and delete partitions from this section as well as format the installation partition in whatever file system you want.

    NTFS really is the best option for XP/2000. It's more secure (can't be read from DOS and allows proper folder/file security settings) and is more efficent too. However - if you do install XP using NTFS, then Windows 98 or DOS will not be able to even see that partition, let alone get to any files on it.

    When the installation procedure is complete you'll have the NT bootloader menu appear upon bootup. Choose your OS and you're off.

    I've done this a million times, so just ask if there's anything you're unsure of.
     
  4. Jeff

    Jeff Supporting Actor

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    Rob, thanks a bunch!!!
     
  5. Michael Harris

    Michael Harris Screenwriter

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    When installing XP for dual boot, can one use the upgrade version or does one need the full version?
     
  6. Ken Chan

    Ken Chan Producer

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  7. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  8. DerrickRemmert

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  9. Jeff

    Jeff Supporting Actor

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    One more question...If I want to go XP exclusively later on and make my second hard drive (Drive D with XP) my main drive, Drive C, is it easy to change this since XP is looking for everything in drive D?


    Thanks,


    Jeff
     
  10. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  11. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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  12. DerrickRemmert

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  13. Rob Gillespie

    Rob Gillespie Producer

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    FDISK is a DOS program that allows you set up disk partitions.

    Disk partitions fall into three types: Primary DOS, Extended DOS and Logical.

    Primary DOS should be the first partition on the drive that you're intending to boot from. It will also need to be made active. You can have another three Primary partitions on a single HD but there's not much point.

    Extended DOS should cover the remainder of the drive after the Primary DOS has been created.

    Logical drives are created within the Extended DOS partition and become the other 'drives' that Windows sees after the Primary.

    So for example, you could have something like:

    Primary DOS ( C: )
    Extended DOS
    ..then within that...
    Logical ( D: )
    Logical ( E: )
     

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