Need help finding VERTICAL GRADE black super gloss Formica

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Greg P, Feb 11, 2002.

  1. Greg P

    Greg P Stunt Coordinator

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    I contacted a guy at Lowes. He was on the phone with the guy from Formica and he said they only have it in regular grade. I checked the archives and could have sworn someone said they got this in vertical grade. The regular was brand 909. Someone stated that the vertical grade was brand 190, but the guy said they didnt have anything like that.

    Is there a super black gloss Formica "vertical grade"? Where? If not is the regular grade OK to use?

    Thanks,

    Greg
     
  2. I can't help you but you can help me=)

    Can you explain what exactly is vertical grade?
     
  3. Dan Hine

    Dan Hine Screenwriter

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    I asked Brian Steeves what he used. He said High gloss black formica vertical grade. I'm not sure if that is the same as "super" high gloss but it sure looks good. You could try emailing him.

    Dan Hine
     
  4. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    The color number is the same (909). Vertical Grade (20)is available (may also be Postform Grade(25)) in 4x8 sheets, maybe other sizes for black. The Gloss (90) is the finish, which has another number designation.

    So, for black-vertical grade-gloss finish you would order:

    909-20-90

    Anthony,

    Vertical grade (.028")is a thinner grade of laminate than horizontal (.048") or standard thickness.

    Pete
     
  5. Pete, thanks for the info.

    Is there any particular advantage to the thinner formica?
     
  6. ThomasW

    ThomasW Cinematographer

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    Anthony

    Both vertical grade and post forming are thinner and less stiff. Therefore it's easier to make them conform to irregular shapes or curves. Post forming is also cheaper
     
  7. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    The only downside of the thinner grades is they need to be applied to a nice flat surface. Even minor imperfections can telegraph thru, especially with a gloss finish.

    Pete
     
  8. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    I'm working with a local building trades distributor, a "Tile" distributor who also handles laminate, WilsonArt in this case. They've given me some good pricing and can order vertical grade and have it here in a few days. Check your yellow pages.
     
  9. MarkDesMarais

    MarkDesMarais Stunt Coordinator

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    I was looking for laminates on line and ran across these guys-
    http://www.cabinetparts.com/cgi-loca...D=PUT_SID_HERE
    I haven't ordered from them yet, but they appear to carry the whole Wilsonart line, with good pricing and multiple sheet discounts. Dunno how the shipping goes yet though.
    Markd
     
  10. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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    Hey Greg,
    Yes vertical grade is thinner than the stuff used for counter tops but it's not like you're going to be cutting onions on it are you? [​IMG]
    You do need to make sure the substrate is as flat as possible otherwise it will show through.
    One more thing..You can get the high gloss black in what's called "Color Through" where the black goes all the way through the material and it shouldn't cost but a few dollars more.
     
  11. Hank Frankenberg

    Hank Frankenberg Cinematographer

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    Mark, you might want to find a distributor within driving distance. The freight on those big sheets might be very significant.
     
  12. Greg P

    Greg P Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for all the replies!

    Now Im a little confused, should I go with the "regular" "post forming" or "vertical" grade?

    The cabinate is a 17.5 in cube of 1.5 in thick MDF. Everything is cut and I have some boards left to glue together. The dual 3/4 in MDF is made to "lock" together with the interior layer being smaller. I am also going to not round, but make a vertical edge on each of the front corners (So it really has 8 sides (octogonal)) to look like the velo HGS series.
     
  13. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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    Well "Vertical" and "Post Forming" are the same thing and cheaper than regular. I would personally go with the "Vertical/Post Forming" grade mainly because of cost and the fact that it can be had in "Color-through".

    I'm not sure how you plan to wrap Formica on an angle like the Velos? The Mica will break for sure on a 45* angle. I looked at the Velos and what they use is a high gloss vinyl that allows them to "Wrap" the sub around the sharp angles, it's not Mica.
     
  14. Jack Gilvey

    Jack Gilvey Producer

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    Greg, I think that the you'll be fine with vertical grade over MDF as it's a nice, smooth surface to begin with, just watch that any imperfections are well filled and sanded. As I noted, I like the fact that the edges are so small with the stuff, and I actually find mine a little less noticeable than those on the NHT SuperCenter I've got on hand, the edges of which are heavily bevelled.

    Since my box was ply, the "waviness" of the surface does come through a bit, but with MDF you should really be able to get a "piano black" look. I may try a slightly thicker grade in the future, although the Baltic birch I plan on using seems to have at least one side that's almost perfectly smooth.
     
  15. Greg P

    Greg P Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for all the advice.

    Actually I want to cut a piece for each side. I want to have 8 sides. I want to make the corners a small inch or so width, not rounded. I was planing on cutting 4 little strips for these corners.(Im only planing on doing this on the front to back of the sub all other edges will stay square. For example you will only see 8 edges looking from the front of the sub.) Do you think this will work?

    Thanks
     
  16. Brian Steeves

    Brian Steeves Second Unit

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    I think you will have a hard time getting the edges routed without damaging one side of the 45* or the other. I suppose you could build up a couple layers of tape for the bearing of the flush trim/laminate trimming bit to trid on, but you'd have to be real steady handed not to tip the router while cutting.
     
  17. Pete Mazz

    Pete Mazz Supporting Actor

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    Your idea wouldn't be too hard if you've got a good file or sanding block. Just cut your laminate pieces with less overhang and then file. The thinner grades would make this a lot easier. Just be careful when placing the laminate to get it lined up right.

    If you have some money for tools...get a tilt base for a laminate trimmer.

    Pete
     

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