Need Help filling out first job application.

Travis D

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I just got an application for Blockbuster and this would be my first job. I would like suggestions for how far I could stretch things like "Special Training." I'd say I know more about computers, movies, home theater, and video release dates than 90% of current Blockbuster employes. But that would be bragging.

If anything at all, just tell us about your first job application and anything you put on it that was out of the norm.
 

Ted Lee

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by all means...brag but don't sound cocky! you'll have to include a resume! use words like strong, in-depth, above-average, etc
as this is your first job, you should orient your resume in such a way that it highlights your hobbies and interests, etc. hopefully you've got a decent gpa? if so, put that on there too...an employer will take that into consideration.
but, for sure...have some section called "hobbies & interests" or something like that. that's where you'll shine and really show that you know your movie stuff. use bullet points and do something like:
  • DVD: strong knowledge of current and future releases
  • Technology: in-depth understanding of dvd technology and terminology
  • Computers: strong working skills with [insert pc format here]
stuff like that should work. if you'd like, contact me once you finish your resume and i'll be more than happy to help critique it for ya!

oh yeah...if you go for an interview...for heaven's sake...dress nicely. you may not need a tie, but don't wear jeans, tennis shoes or a t-shirt. doc martins or something similar, khaki pants and a button down long-sleeve shirt!
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Travis D

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My GPA is on average in the 3.6 to 3.8 area and I know the value of first impressions when it comes to dressing up.
I would really like to know where I could find a good outline of a resume if you know one Ted. Maybe someone else knows where I could find one. I want this very badly.
And if anyone wants to know why I want to work at BB it's because you have to be over 18 to wok at Staples, Circuit City, Comp USA, Movie Gallery, and Sears.
 

Aurel Savin

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Travis:
I truely belive that you will get the job... serious!
If you are a member of the HTF, you are educated and civilized enough to go waaay past the othr candidates.
Shake hands, make eye contact, be confident and it yours!
Good luck!
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Brad_W

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I know the value of first impressions when it comes to dressing up.
Good for you! Not many teens or even early 20-somethings know how to dress.
I worked at Hollywood Video for a while and:
1. When people came to ask for an app. they dressed like gangsta rappas. That doesn't give a good first impression. I wouldn't want to hire someone I was annoyed by instantly.
2. When filling out these apps. the morons didn't know their social security number! What moron/loser doesn't A: know their soc. or B: if they don't know it, bring the damn card with you.???
3. If you fill out an app. at the store, bring all nessessary info with you. Bring a lil resume just for yourself to copy down on the app. There's nothing worse than annoying the employees by asking for a phone book because YOU came unprepared. Oh, and bring a pen too!
4. Definately dress nicely. Don't over-dress, but under-dressing would be the worst thing you could do.
5. Always ask a question during an interview! This shows that you are interested in the company.
6. DON'T discuss money! Even if you are hired on the spot, don't ask until your second or third day working. It's just rude.
7. List your GPA on the app. (of course, only if it's good)
I can't think of any more at this time/I'm lazy.
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Dome Vongvises

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Yes, people in Personel are usually very superficial. Dress very nice and accordingly.
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MikeAlletto

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Uhh...this is for a part time...minimum wage job at a video store right? If so don't worry about a resume...don't worry about getting all spiffy and dressed up (don't look like a bum, just look normal). Just fill out the application and be honest. Unless you are looking for a career in scanning bar codes on tape boxes you really don't have to worry about it. Hell for my first job at McDonalds when asked why I wanted the job I said because I need money. Which was the truth...they don't care they need need warm bodies to do the work noone else wants to do.
Oh and because you work at blockbuster that does not mean you are in the movie business. There is a music store here where the employees are so stuck up and high and mighty thinking about themselves its sickening. They think they are in the "music biz" because they work a minimum wage job as stockboys and cashiers at a music store.
Don't mean to sound cruel, but it is just a part-time job. You'll make some cash, maybe meet some new people, and maybe develop some work ethics of some kind, but don't expect to get much more out of it than that.
 

Travis D

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Hehehe... I know it's not the movie buisness.
I'm not looking to be the next Tarantino. (especially not at acting.) But at 17, I do like the idea of working next to one of my great loves. The fact that you get 5 rentals a week free doesn't hurt either. Still, I have a personal motto that I keep to in everything I do: "Buisness first, pleasure second; but it's a VERY close second." I figure that has always kept me level headed.
Also, on the field: "Wanted Position" and "Expected Pay", how would I word that and not come off sounding like a jackass who wants too much or too little money?
[Edited last by Travis D on October 29, 2001 at 09:41 PM]
[Edited last by Travis D on October 29, 2001 at 09:45 PM]
 

Brian_J

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Don't ever turn in an application without first arranging a meeting with the manager (or whoever does the hiring) or at least handing it directly to the manager. Otherwise, apps typically go to some place never to be seen again.
Brian
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Ted Lee

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no disrespect to mike but i disagree with what he's saying.
yes, this is only a part-time job, and no, it's not going to be your career (unless you get into management or something) but that doesn't mean you shouldn't take the interview and application seriously. it's still a job you're trying to get and (if hired) the business is relying on you to be professional and responsible.
i used to tell my employees "you get out of a job what you want to - no more, no less" (or something like that). i would never chastise a lazy employee, but the ones that worked hard, etc. got all my perks.
to look for a good resume format, just go to any bookstore and check out some of the books on resume writing. they usually have lots of different formats, one of which will definitely fit your bill. there's probably some on-line sites too...
for wanted position (if you don't care) put "any". for expected pay, i'd post here first to see what the "average" salary is for blockbuster employees. if you get an answer, go for somewhere around there. if you don't get an answer or you're not comfortable, put "open" in there. i imagine you'd probably get a little over minimum wage, but i'm not sure.
hope that helps - you sound pretty level headed and i think you'll do fine.

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Ryan Wright

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Also, on the field: "Wanted Position" and "Expected Pay", how would I word that and not come off sounding like a jackass who wants too much or too little money?
"Wanted Position" : Write "Any"
"Expected Pay" : Leave it blank. If it is brought up during an interview, tell them, "Whatever is reasonable for the position." If they press the issue or try to get you to name your price, I'd be quite frank: "Look, this is a first job and likely pays minimum wage. If you want to pay me more, I would gladly accept, but I only expect to earn the minimum."
This isn't a career where you can play salary games. If you ask for 10 cents more, they can just go out and hire someone else - it's not like the job really requires skills. All they need is a reasonably intelligent person with a good work ethic. In fact, I think it's insane that a job like that has "Expected pay" on the application.
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Ted Lee

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this is a fun thread - i like hearing other people strategies when interviewing
"Look, this is a first job and likely pays minimum wage. If you want to pay me more, I would gladly accept, but I only expect to earn the minimum."
ryan -
i'd probably do it a little different. by saying it like that you're "short-changing" yourself. if you say you only expect minimum wage, that's what you're gonna get. bump it up a buck or two - the worst thing they'll say is that's too high and this is what we can do. make sure you say it nicely though...something like:
"well, i'd like to make X dollars an hour, but i'm willing hear what the range is?" - or something like that. be cool with them - they'll see you're being mature, blah blah blah and maybe "want" you more than someone else who just says give me X dollars or i won't work for you.
heck...how much does a blockbuster employee make anyway?
oh yeah...there's no way you'll be working your first day and not knowing how much you're making. they're gonna tell you before you ever start. if they don't then something is way whack!
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Ryan Wright

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Don't ever turn in an application without first arranging a meeting with the manager (or whoever does the hiring) or at least handing it directly to the manager.
Also the best advice I've ever heard. I'd recommend going in when a manager is on duty. Find out what his name is early on and ask for him by name. ("Hello, I'd like to speak to Mr. Joe Manager.") Have your resume and application in a folder so the employees don't see it, otherwise, they may just take it from you and not let you talk to the manager.
When he comes out, introduce yourself and shake his hand. Tell him you've been renting there for x years/months/whatever (be honest), then tell him how much you like his store (lie if you have to
). Close by handing him your resume/application and telling him you would love to come to work for him.
Quick example: "Hi Mr. Manager, my name is John Doe." (shake his hand) "I've been renting videos from you for 2 years now and I think you run an excellent store here." (Your application is still in your folder. Right now, he has no idea you're going to ask for a job and probably thinks you're going to complain about something.) "I am currently looking for my first job, and given my love for movies and your store's reputation in the community, I would love to come to work for you." (Pull out your resume and hand it to him)
The compliments will work to your advantage! I bet none of his other employees approached him like this when they wanted a job. He will be impressed, and you'll have a damn good chance of being hired. When you're done speaking with him, be sure to shake his hand again and thank him for his time.
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Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes.
That way, when you do criticize them, you'll be a mile away and you'll have their shoes.
 

Ted Lee

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excellent advice ryan!

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Brad_W

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yes, this is only a part-time job, and no, it's not going to be your career (unless you get into management or something) but that doesn't mean you shouldn't take the interview and application seriously. it's still a job you're trying to get and (if hired) the business is relying on you to be professional and responsible.
Thanks Ted, showing up dressed like "normal" for an interview, regardless of the job, is biblically wrong in the employment world. Whether it be for a job cleaning toilets or running a business, you have to show that you are serious about getting the job.
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Ryan Wright

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i'd probably do it a little different. by saying it like that you're "short-changing" yourself. if you say you only expect minimum wage, that's what you're gonna get.
Not exactly. These types of jobs aren't "negotiating" jobs. They pay a set amount. After you've been there for awhile, if you're a valuable employee you might be able to get an extra 25 to 50 cents an hour, but for the most part you're going to get whatever the job pays. Unlike a career position, the manager is not going to be under any pressure to acquire a key employee for as little money as possible. They work on set prices: The manager gets x employees and he can pay them x amount of money. Sometimes he can give raises. That's pretty much it.
There's also not a lot of "selling yourself" that goes on with minimum wage jobs when it comes to salary. You've got to sell yourself to get the job, but once they decide to hire you, you're not going to be able to say, "Oh, you're only paying $6 an hour? Well, I'd like $7." There are plenty of people who are willing to do the job for the $6 an hour they're paying and since the job requires little skill, they'll have no problem finding someone else.
With a position paying $50k, special skills are usually required, and you can get away with asking for more because (a) They're always offering less than they're willing to pay, and (b) It's hard to find employees. They'll pay you the extra $3k every year because it could take another 6 months to find someone with your skills who will do the job for less. People don't usually play these games with minimum wage jobs. They post the position and the most they're willing to pay is already on the table.
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-Ryan (http://www.ryanwright.com )
Before you criticize someone, walk a mile in their shoes.
That way, when you do criticize them, you'll be a mile away and you'll have their shoes.
 

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