Need Help - Buying TV -1080p, DLP or LCD??

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Mark Abrams, Oct 24, 2005.

  1. Mark Abrams

    Mark Abrams Stunt Coordinator

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    I have just had to junk my 15-y/o Mitsu RPTV and am very much in the market to buy (AND have calibrated) a new
    DLP or LCD TV...

    Now, I live in a very rural area, where the local cable TV company does NOT deliver HD signals, nor is it likely to in the forseeable future, from what they tell me. I *MAY* be situated OK for satellite TV but my southern exposure isn't exactly unobstructed.

    So, given that I'll be dealing with a lot of SD programming, I'm wondering what is the best to spend $$
    on now... I've read that 1080p TVs out now don't actually
    accept 1080p outside source signals, so what's the point?
    If I get a 1080i/720p set, should I look at upgrading my DVD player to progressive scan?

    As for 1080p, I've read Samsung doesn't allow you to turn off the DNiE technology, affecting accurate dark detail -
    what about Mitsubishi 1080p's?? My other leaning is toward
    the newer Sony XBR post-Qualia models ... Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated. Whatever my ultimate choice, I certainly intend to have the set professionally calibrated...
     
  2. Mark Abrams

    Mark Abrams Stunt Coordinator

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    Please can anybody offer any guidance here for me? I notice the Samsung 67 series DLP's are going pretty cheap
    these days - what chip do they use in them and is the contrast ratio acceptable?

    My only hesitation with LCD TVs is the dead pixel issue -

    Which would be better for heavy use - I usually have the TV on working at home during the day as well as in the evening...
     
  3. Dave>h

    Dave>h Second Unit

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    HI Mark,

    I own a Samsung DLP HLN61XB00 or something like that. I have had it for about 1.5 years now and love it. However, I do most of my viewing in the evening and mostly it is SD source.

    I recently upgraded my DVD to an upconverting Toshiba and I find that really does improve the PQ on SD source DVD's. The fine detail is much improved as are the black levels.

    I believe Samsung has updated the chips in their DLP's so you may get a better PQ with the newer models, this I can't comment on. What I can say is, that although it did take some time to tweak the picture to my liking (and you would probably avoid this by having it professinally calibrated) once I got it there, the picture is stunning. The TV, thus far, has been ultra reliable and I really can't say anything bad about it.

    My only complaint and this is probably more a function of my room configuration than a fault of the TV, is that during daytime viewing, I have to adjust the setting to the Samsung preset called "Dynamic" to get the brightness up to be able to see the picture properly during very bright days. Other than that, this has been a great TV and a great purchase.

    I personally like it better than the LCD's I have seen but they may have improved recently too.

    Regards,

    DAve
     
  4. John S

    John S Producer

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    Dead pixel issues are pretty rare still, so don't be to decieved by posts on the net about it. One of those if you have one, you are certainly likely to post about it sort of things. I have seen pretty many LCD's out there, and have yet to run into it, that's what I base that opinion about it on.

    On a different note, nothing wrong with score'n a great deal on a large DLP dsiplay either, even an older model. The store you buy from should have a liberal return policy, so no matter what display you buy, within 30 days if you don't like it, you won't have to live with it.
     
  5. Mark Abrams

    Mark Abrams Stunt Coordinator

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    Thanks for this input, guys ... the more and more I read about the new generation 1080p DLPs, unable to take any 1080p inputs, the more I think to myself, what's the point?
    Even the upscaling DVD players out there now will only upconvert to 720p/1080i I think?? Am I right about this?

    Furthermore, in my rural area, our local cable TV provider is unlikely to get HD let alone 1080p HD broadcasting anytime in the forseeable future; I am, of course, thinking about going satellite just to get the HD broadcasts, anyway,.. but by and large I figure that most of the viewing will be from SD sources.

    I may have to go to a bigger city this weekend to view some of the 1080p's first-hand, but I know I've seen last year's
    Samsung models and they are stunning when properly calibrated. I've heard it said that unless you're really up close, very few people can tell the difference between 720p/1080i & 1080p. At normal viewing distances it shouldn't be an issue.

    What about the chip /color wheel, though? Are Samsung's 67-series models as good as the new 68/78-series ones coming out? Especially with respect to rainbows etc? (I have yet to see a rainbow, but then again I may not have viewed under the right circumstances yet...)
     
  6. Chris Gerhard

    Chris Gerhard Screenwriter

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    The NeuNeo HVD2085 will upconvert to 1080p over component and HDMI. The HVD2081 will upconvert to 1080p over component only. I believe there are expensive players that will do this but I would avoid an expensive DVD player at this time. I don't have a 1080p display and can't comment if upconverting DVD to 1080p improves over 720p or 1080i.

    Chris
     
  7. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    You do realize that DLPs also can have dead pixels. They just manifest themselves on screen differently. They look like watermarks/spots. As if you sneezed on the screen, but you can't clean it off.

    Each technology has its pros and cons. Not liking dead pixels is one thing, but if the rainbows give you a headache, then that does not help much either.

    Regards
     
  8. Michael TLV

    Michael TLV THX Video Instructor/Calibrator

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    Greetings

    The additional pixels of 1080p will matter more depending on how far back one sits from a TV. After a certain point, the human can't decern the extra pixel advantage over the 720p sets so why pay for something you won't see (other than bragging rights).

    Regards
     
  9. Mark Abrams

    Mark Abrams Stunt Coordinator

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    Is Samsung ever likely to enable the DNiE technology to be turned off on the -68 and -78 DLP 1080p models? (i.e., firmware update??)... Also, what exactly IS the difference between the 68 & 78 series TVs??
     
  10. Yong Chan

    Yong Chan Stunt Coordinator

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    "Now, I live in a very rural area, where the local cable TV company does NOT deliver HD signals, nor is it likely to in the forseeable future, from what they tell me"

    HD is broadcast over the air. You don't need the cable company, you just need an old fashioned TV antennae that goes on the roof (or in the attic) and an HD receiver to decode it. If you have a homeowner's association that frowns on antennaes, they can't stop you. Some TV's come with an HD receiver built in and not just "HD ready"

    As for buying suggestions, it is always advisable to give everyone a budget or price range.

    YC
     
  11. Allan Jayne

    Allan Jayne Cinematographer

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    Can you get stations over the air (with an antenna)?

    With an upconverting DVD player you are subject to the de-interlacing quality that the specific player provides. Other than Faroudja DCDI and Silicon Image chips which are excellent, I am not sure what de-interlacing chips are good.,

    The way "everyone is talking" if reception of regular channels is fuzzy, reception of HDTV and digital channels from the same stations will cut in and out. It depends on how much transmitter power the station is using for its digital signal which power must be greater for consistent reception within the same coverage area.

    If you live in a rented apartment or in a coop or condo., almost always the homeowners association or the landlord can stop you from fastening antennas (or anything else) to the outside of the building or on the roof. Generally you may purchase and erect a pole or you may put the antenna on the ground.

    Video hints:
    http://members.aol.com/ajaynejr/video.htm
     
  12. Yong Chan

    Yong Chan Stunt Coordinator

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    Almost every HOA will have bylaws regulating the use of over the air antennae. However, the FCC passed OTARD (Over-the-Air Reception Devices Rule). This federal law prevents the restrictions imposed by both governmental and nongovernmental sources on the reception from direct broadcast satellites. I don't want to get too in depth into this since the FAQ sheet will answer most questions.

    http://www.fcc.gov/mb/facts/otard.html

    Basically, local government nor HOA's can prevent you from receiving over the air broadcast. The antennae covered are satellite dishes less than one meter or any TV antennae whose mast is less than 12 feet above your roofline. The only caveat to this rule is if your antennae or dish represents a safety hazard.

    It does get trickier for Multi dwelling units (ie apts or condos). If you have a balcony or porch that is for your exclusive use, you may use it for your purpose even if there is overhang. You may not be able to place one on the roof or wall of the condo.

    Bottom line, if you are willing to piss off your HOA or landlord, you can pretty much do as you please in regards to placing an antennae. They have no legal recourse, and this has been defended multiple times. In fact, at the end of the FAQ, there is a number to call if you want to file a petition.

    As for myself, I recently told my HOA at my townhouse to kiss my butt. Felt so good.
     

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