Need advice on home theater EQ's

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Mark Leiter, Oct 28, 2001.

  1. Mark Leiter

    Mark Leiter Second Unit

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    I'm interested in get an Equalizer for my HT. Is there a company out there that makes a single model that can handle the 6-8 channels of the standard HT, including the sub? Or am I stuck buying 3 two channel EQs and trying to work something that way.
    I went looking at a few stores this weekend (Circuit City, Best Buy and Sound Advice) but they really didn't offer much. Just one 2-channel Yamaha model that ran $400. That's $1200 to do what I want to do. there has to be a better way.
    This is a new area for me in HT so advice on types and best brands and such would also be appriceated.
    Thanks all
    Mark
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  2. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    What is it you need to achieve with an equalizer? What is lacking in your system you are wanting to correct? Knowing that would help in giving advice.
    Deane
     
  3. Mark Leiter

    Mark Leiter Second Unit

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    This mainly started with a friend of mine that did it to his system. He told that he really liked the results of going through with a tone disc and db meter flatening out the different spikes and dips in that result from a HT being placed in a room that was not accousticly designed for HT.
    Doing a quick check of my system I found that the db can vary as much a 10db going from one frequency to another. Especially in the mid bass range. I have also always had trouble with my sub sounding "boomy" with certin movies. I've adjusted played around with the sub as much as I can but it still dosen't sound right to me.
    My thought is once I have an EQ I can go in with my tone disc and meter flaten out all those fequencies. Hopefully I can for the most part adjust for the accoustical defienciences of the room I am forced to use.
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    Mark F. Leiter
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  4. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    I'll leave the issue of equalizing the main speaker channels to someone with experience in doing that. I have always felt that adding an eqaulizer to that portion of the spectrum was not a good idea.
    The sub frequencies are another issue. Most rooms will have a room spike at some frequency that needs to be flattened out. Mine was a 16db spike at 42hz. My sub always had a hard thud sound to it. I don't know if that's the same as what some call boomy or not.
    What did happen was that removing it allowed the overall sub to be run higher. It gave it a much solider, broader sound. I get much deeper bass out of it since it isn't reduced in volume to accomodate the 42hz spike. I used the Berringer Feedback Destroyer which works very well. Others have used other brands with complete success.
    The reason I would be reluctant to equalize the main frequencies would be the fear of adding all of the extra electronic manipulation to the main audio chain.
    Perhaps someone with experience in doing that will jump in with some thoughts.
    Deane
     
  5. Mark Leiter

    Mark Leiter Second Unit

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    I think FQ spike at 42hz you experienced is the same thing I’m getting. About a 10db spike at 45hz, well, this is the closest I can get to the exact frequency with the tone disc that I am using. And again I have not done a precise speaker by speaker check so I really don’t know exactly where any other spikes might be. (the 45hz spike must be comming from the sub 'cause my processor redirects frequencys below 80hz from all the main channels to the sub)
    As far as higher frequencys go (above 80hz), I have heard that most soundtracks intentionally raise the level of some frequencies in the center channel because in most movie theaters that speaker is placed behind the screen necessitating higher volume at certain frequencies in order to penetrate it. I know that some higher end processors have circuitry that can correct for this. Mine however does not. Can I use a separate EQ to correct this manually?
    It’s these kinds of things I’m trying to correct for. I want to eliminate this constant practice (especially during action movies) of turning up the volume during dialogue and turning down the volume during the action parts.
    You mentioned a “Berringer Feedback Destroyer “ is this a EQ made specificly for subwoofers? Can you give me more info about it?
    And any more thought would also be welcome.
    Thanks
    Mark
    [Edited last by Mark Leiter on October 29, 2001 at 12:17 PM]
    [Edited last by Mark Leiter on October 29, 2001 at 12:18 PM]
     
  6. Mark Leiter

    Mark Leiter Second Unit

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    Deane,
    Thanks for your responses they have given me a good starting point.
    ADMINISTRATORS - Please close this thread. I have discovered an older thread that I can post most of my questions to.
     
  7. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Mark:
    Assuming you're still checking this thread, the Beringher Feedback Destroyer is the "BFD" we refer to. It's made for stage work to automatically stop PA system feedback. I just happens to work extremely well for equalizing room problems with subs.
    I'm not sure equalization is going to solve your dialoque vs. action problem with levels. That may be something different in your system giving you that effect.
    The high end boost you talk about is indeed a problem with highs being boosted for theaters. I've noticed that more and more DVDs are being released with this problem being solved in the mix.
    The best way to get rid of the boosted highs problem is with a receiver that has some sort of Cinema ReQ built in. Many do and call it something else since Cinema ReQ is a LucasFilm patent and trademark.
    I used to have a real problem with highs in my system, running my Cinema ReQ 85% of the time. I happened to change the coax cable from my DVD player to the receiver from a Monster Cable Series 3 to a Better Cables Ultra. Both about the same price. All of the obnoxius and raspy highs immediately disappeard and now I almost never turn Cinema ReQ on. I'm not suggesting that's your problem, just sharing the experience I had for whatever it's worth.
    The other thing that would come to mind would be your room acoustics. If you have sound bouncing around in the room, that's going to contribute a great deal to your problem. My chairs are near a back wall. I built a large sound absorbing panel and covered it with some fabric that makes it look like a piece of artwork. The elimination of the sound bouncing off that back wall and into my ears out of phase with the orginal really changed things.
    With all of these changes we now listen to almost everything at Dolby Reference (75db using Video Essentials) with no sound problems.
    I mention all of these things to make the point that there are a lot of possible solutions to sound problems.
    Deane
     

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