Need advice/have questions on a receiver I have coming in (electrical)

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Shawn_S, Apr 5, 2002.

  1. Shawn_S

    Shawn_S Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2000
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    Don't know where to put this as it's about receivers, but since I have no idea what I'm doing I figured the basic area would be best so here goes...
    I have a new receiver coming...
    http://www.yamaha.com/cgi-win/webcg...VR00010RX-V1200
    I have a older than average house. How can I check to see if I can run this receiver (and everything else) from the electrical outlet/power supply. Doesn't there have to be a certain number of watts or something so my equipment won't cut off on me or blow my surge protector?
    By this question, you can tell I have no idea what I'm getting into, but I need a HT set up. I have some good surge protectors already for my TV, Sat, Dreamcast, VCR (on its way out in favor of the receiver) & DVD player.
    Anything else I should consider before the receiver comes in.
    One more question.
    I don't have the cash for speakers right now, but I have a 17 year old JVC self system with 2 speakers that put out good sound (at least to my untrained ears). Each speaker uses 2 separate wires (4 wires total). Could I hook these speakers up to my receiver and use them till I can afford more speakers?
     
  2. Kevin P

    Kevin P Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 1999
    Messages:
    1,439
    Likes Received:
    0
    You should be ok, receivers don't use a lot of power, at least unless you play them way too loud all the time. As long as it isn't plugged into the same circuit as your refrigerator or toaster you should be fine. I do recommend a surge protector though.

    As for your speakers, do you mean each speaker has a pair of wires (as in a positive and a negative, or a red and a black)? Or two pairs of wires? One pair is normal for most speakers. If they have two pairs of wires (four conductors to one speaker), that means the speakers are bi-amped or bi-wired, which would be unusual on a shelf system. Or perhaps the speakers have amps built into them, which would render them incompatible with anything other than the JVC.

    Assuming each speaker has a single (pair of) wires, you should be able to connect them to your Yamaha. Just don't turn it up too loud because they may not be able to handle the power the Yamaha can put out.

    KJP
     
  3. Shawn_S

    Shawn_S Stunt Coordinator

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2000
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    0
    KevinP-yes two wires for each speaker. One red one black.

    Yea, I figured I would just hook them up but not try to blow the house away until I got some cash for more speakers. Thanks for the advice.
     
  4. Bill Kane

    Bill Kane Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2001
    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    0
    Shawn, does your house have a circuit breaker box, or fuses? Just for homeowner knowledge, it's good to know what else is on the wiring circuit you're using for home entertainment. You might throw the circuit breaker or pull the fuse to the sound/tv system and see what else in the house goes off. If you have fuses, make sure they're the rated 15amp and not 25or30amp (which cud overload/overheat the wiring under high current draws).

    I suppose it's not a concern, but for example what if someone is using a hair dryer in the bathroom if it's on the same circuit as the AV system...
     
  5. Greg_R

    Greg_R Screenwriter

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2000
    Messages:
    1,996
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Real Name:
    Greg
    Determine the gauge of wire for the circuit that your HT is on. 14 gauge will handle 15amps, 12 gauge will handle 20amps. The fuse box is there to protect the wiring from overheating (so the fuses should be sized for the wire). Is there anything else on your HT's electrical circuit (i.e. additional load)?

    FWIW, I run a Denon 5700, RPTV, 2500W amp, DVD player, & various lights from the same circuit w/o any power delivery problems. You can calculate your system load by adding all the current draw (in amps) of each component. Keep in mind that Watts = Volts*amps (so divide watts by 120 to get amps). The entire load on the line should not exceed 80% of the max rating (i.e. a 20amp circuit shouldn't continuously draw more than 16amps).
     

Share This Page