Need a Fortran 90 compiler

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Anthony_Gomez, Sep 10, 2002.

  1. Time to resurect a dinosaur.

    I need to get a compiler for fortran 90 (fortran95 is optional) that runs under windows XP. It must be inexpensive of freeware (with no built in advertising).

    If academic packages are an option, I will go that way.

    Anyone have any suggestions?
     
  2. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    wow, blast from the past. They were teaching fortran90 when I was at montana state back in 96/97 but I opted for C at the time. This helps you not at all does it? [​IMG]
     
  3. Jay H

    Jay H Producer

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    Jay
    Wow, what a surprise, I remember FORTRAN90, I was working over the summer in a research place using High Performance Fortran which is a massively parallel processing language based on FORTRAN90 on a Connection Machines (RIP) CM-5 supercomputer... I remember working with a RA in some computational fluid dynamics problem. However, the compiler wasn't a FORTRAN90 compiler but a HPF compiler.
    At work, I do some legacy work in plain old FORTRAN (FORTRAN77) for the Motorola 68030 platform, but we use a compiler from Oasis which I have no idea if they exist anymore, I think they became Green Hills Software which under a googles search still exists:
    www.ghs.com, however I don't see any FORTRAN90 compiler..
    If you want I can try to see if I can dig up my old RA and ask him to see what he uses, although with a university, they probably use something that isn't cheap...
    Jay
     
  4. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    I think for the lab my university used an OLD OLD VAX mainframe to compile, aptly named T-Rex and T-rex2
     
  5. Steven K

    Steven K Supporting Actor

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    Wow... I wish I could remember the Intel-based Fortran 90 compiler that we used in College... that and the COBOL 85 compiler (we had one that ran on an HPUX machine as well). Oh those were the days [​IMG]
    Next, someone's gonna want an ADA compiler [​IMG]
     
  6. Philip_G

    Philip_G Producer

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    ada was taught at my current university for Ccsi 103 up until 2 years ago, now they've moved on to Vb [​IMG]
     
  7. Robert F. O'Connor

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    Under the theory that there are always alternatives, can you explain a little of your situation?
    More practically, here's a link I found to a PDF price sheet for a company called Lahey that sells Fortran compilers of all kinds: http://www.lahey.com/pricelst.pdf.
    Note that they have a Fortran 90 compiler for $200 which has an educational license price of around $80.00 if you are working through a school.
    They also make a Fortran compiler for Microsoft's ".Net", but it doesn't seem to be ready to go. The ".Net" SDK is free however (including all compilers, linkers, etc.) and there may be other Fortran compilers for it in the works from academic sources. I know a lot of otherwise academic and obscure languages like Haskell and Scheme are being developed to work with .Net. The ultimate advantage of .Net is that once you get a program running it is not a lot of sweat to start taking advantage of the .Net CLR and Framework to end up with a full Windows application without learning a new language.
    -Robert
     

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