NEC HT1100 Anamophic or Not

Discussion in 'Displays' started by Matt_G, Apr 15, 2004.

  1. Matt_G

    Matt_G Auditioning

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    I am interested in the NEC HT1000 and HT1100. However, I can't decide which to get. If I go for the HT1100 I believe I want to go for the anamophic lens. Any thoughts? If I don't go with the anamophic lens I might as well get the HT1000 which is much cheaper. Or, is the HT1100 that much better than the HT1000? (100 lumens more and 500 more contrast)

    If I do buy the anamophic lens how will 4x3 content look?

    Thanks! -matt
     
  2. David Parrish

    David Parrish Stunt Coordinator

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    With the anamorphic lens 16:9 will have more detail and be brighter because all the pixels are used. The Ht1000 has black bars above and below the screen.

    4:3 content will fit inside the 16:9 image created by the anamorphic lens. In other words it's like a wide screen TV displaying 4:3 content.

    If you want to buy the HT1100 I personally think your biggest question is whether or not to jump up to a HD2 chip. There are several HD2 chipset projectors within a few hundred bucks of the HT1100.

    In fact, the Sharp 9000 with an HD2 chip is going for 3,500. That is if they are still around.

    Good luck!
     
  3. Matt_G

    Matt_G Auditioning

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    I have a question about the anamorphic lens. I just got off the phone with NEC. They told me that the anamorphic lens is for changing 4x3 content into 16x9 (basically stretching it). They also said that if you have 16x9 content and are displaying it with an anamorphic lens then this will be stretched even more (like twice to make it very skinny). Can you shed some light on this lens? Does anyone have it? What will happen when you display 4x3 content and what will happen when you display 16x9.

    Thanks a bunch! -matt
     
  4. GregAnderson

    GregAnderson Extra

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    My understanding is that you would set your HD STB or DVD to 16:9, and your set the NEC to Anamorphic.

    I believe the NEC/anamorphic has a constant width, which means the lens compresses vertically. So the NEC would be acting like a 16-9, but since the DMD is 4:3, the image would be compressed horizontally. Then the anamorphic lens would compress the image vertically back to 16-9. If you set the DVD or STB to 4:3, then the black bars are in image and everything would be stretched (or actually compressed vertically so they look stretched).
    You could also set the input to 4:3 and the NEC to 4:3 and move the lens out of the way for 4:3 content.

    I don't see any reason you would want to stretch 4:3. You would either use anamorphic mode (to show the 4:3 image pillarboxed) or you would flip the lens out of the way to show 4:3 at full width (but would need a 4:3 screen that you would probably want to mask when watching 16:9). Either way, I'd be surprised if you got the right information.

    I could be wrong since I don't own one. I'm sure someone will set me straight if that is the case.

    I'd get the lens. For $200, it is well worth it.

    I don't think I'll be buying an FP for another 12-18 months, but if I was buying sooner, I'd be seriously looking at the 1100 w/lens. I've seen it for really good prices with the $150 rebate.

    Good Luck, Greg
     
  5. Matt_G

    Matt_G Auditioning

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    Greg thanks a ton!

    Also where have you found this projector with the 16:9 bundle? I have only been able to find it at TVAuthority.com

    Thanks. -matt
     
  6. GregAnderson

    GregAnderson Extra

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    TV Authority is one of the places I've seen it. I also heard about a $150 rebate through April. Don't know if the TVA price includes the rebate.
    You can also try looking at AVS Forum. Some of the AVS resellers have reasonable prices. I've also seen good "Buy it Now" prices on EBay, but have heard that Credit Cards through PayPal don't project you, so proceed with caution.

    Greg

    P.S. An NEC 1100 was shown at a shootout covered over at AVS as well. A couple of good comments can be found about it.
     
  7. Paul_Scott

    Paul_Scott Lead Actor

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    when using an anamorphic lens, you set your dvd player (or source) to 16:9 and you set the projector to normal (or 4:3)-
    NOT cinema.

    you want the feed coming into the projector to be distorted ( all the image information minus black bars will be crammed into the active full panel).
    it is the lens which squeezes the picture back out to appear normal.

    an anamorphic lens is not a magic bullet.
    theoretically you get more resolution, but in practice you are also getting more lines between pixels (since you are going from 576 x 1024 to 768 x 1024).
    if you want the lens because you think the picture will have less of a screendoor (due to the higher res) you need to realize that its the space between the pixels that gives the screendoor appearence, and with the lens you are increasing the # of spaces as well as the number of pixels.

    to me, its very much a wash.
    while i'm sure the HT1100 is an improvment over the 1000, the price for the 1000 means you are getting one hell of a projector for chump change.
    the best value, imo, is just the old HT1000- while they last.

    other than that, i would go for a native HD2+ projector, which is still going to be several thousand more (at least) for most of this year yet.
     
  8. joey mr

    joey mr Stunt Coordinator

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    just to let you guys know that the canadian ht1100 will not have the lens [​IMG] why, i have no idea ,but that really sucks [​IMG]
     

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