My Theatre construction

Discussion in 'Archived Threads 2001-2004' started by Randy dela Fuente, Aug 26, 2001.

  1. Randy dela Fuente

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  2. Deane Johnson

    Deane Johnson Supporting Actor

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    Randy:
    Heavy duty! Nice photo layout too.
    Deane
     
  3. Scott-C

    Scott-C Supporting Actor

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    Randy,
    Looks great! Very professional. One question: what does the resilient channeling do? I noticed you put it up on walls and the ceiling.
    Best of luck! I plan on having a dedicated HT at some point in the near future too!
    ------------------
    Scott
     
  4. Wes

    Wes Screenwriter

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    Wes Peterson
    That will be a great theater Randy, I only wish I had the width your room has. My theater is 12x24!
    You are doing an amazing job, keep us posted with more photos!
    Wes
     
  5. Robert Ma

    Robert Ma Second Unit

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    That room is gonna ROCK!
     
  6. Randy dela Fuente

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    Thanks all for the nice comments!
    Scott-the resilient channel helps isolate the drywall from the studs to help with sound control. I didn't want to sacrifice too much space by going double walls all the way around. My office is above a majority of the theatre and the screen and left wall are underground. The only wall I was really concerned about was the right wall because it led out to the hallway which leads upstairs. The back wall is going to be about 4 feet away from the actual back wall of the basement. Here's the specs in more detail working from the outside in (all drywall and soundboard was also installed perpindicular to previous layer)
    Left and screen wall:
    -Concrete
    -1 inch polystyrene
    -2x4s on 16 inch centers
    -2 layers of R-11 unfaced insulation
    -1/2 inch soundboard (siliconed joints)
    -resilient channel on 24 inch centers
    -5/8 firecode drywall (siliconed joints)
    Right wall:
    -removed old drywall and added 2 layers of R-11 unfaced insulation
    -1/2 inch soundboard (siliconed joints)
    -2x4s on 16 inch centers
    -2 layers of R-11 unfaced insulation
    -1/2 inch soundboard(siliconed joints)
    -resilient channel on 24 inch centers
    -5/8 firecode drywall (siliconed joints)
    Ceiling:
    -added 3 layers of R-11 unfaced insulation between 2x12 joists (16 inch centers)
    -1/2 inch soundboard (siliconed joints)
    -resilient channel on 24 inch centers
    -5/8 firecode drywall (siliconed joints)
    -1/2 inch drywall (siliconed joints and glued to 5/8)
    Back wall:
    -5/8 inch drywall (outer surface)
    -1/2 inch soundboard (siliconed joints)
    -2x4s on 16 inch centers
    -2 layers of R-11 unfaced insulation
    -1/2 inch soundboard (siliconed joints)
    -5/8 inch drywall (siliconed joints)
    Trust me, it was as much work as it sounds like. One tool I've discovered during this project is the Duraspin screw gun. Check them out at Home Depot. It has screws on strips and automatically feeds them through the gun. There is know way I could've installed all of this alone (have you ever tried to lift a sheet of 5/8 drywall to the ceiling and screw it in???) The screws come in buckets of 1,000. I'm on my 7th one now.
    I'd much rather overbuild this than go back later and try to fix things. I've posted on another site that I learned a lot from forums like this one as well as magazines and other web sites. I wouldn't be doing anything like this if it wasn't for people willing to take the time to share their experiences. I thought I'd try to give some back.
    I'll try to get some more detail pictures posted soon.
    Thanks again..
    ------------------
    Randy
    http://sportraits.com/ht
    website/theatrefs.html
     
  7. Randy dela Fuente

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    Don't ya hate typos after you've hit submit? It's kinda like locking your keys in the car.
    Any way it should be "no and not "know" in the second to the last paragraph regarding the Duraspin.
    Ooops....
    ------------------
    Randy
    http://sportraits.com/ht
    website/theatrefs.html
     
  8. Scott-C

    Scott-C Supporting Actor

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    Randy,
    Your last post was extremely helpful! It's great to get that level of detail about what went into your wall construction. I'm with you - rather overbuild and know it's done right the first time. [​IMG]
    Sounds like the Duraspin screw gun was a lifesaver! Does it automatically create a starter hole for the screw or do you have to do that yourself? (argh).
    Where do you buy the soundboard, and is it intended solely for sound absorption?
    Thanks, and keep posting those pictures!
    By the way, I believe you can edit a post by clicking on the icon that looks like a pencil and paper, just above the writing area. Just wanted to point it out in case you weren't aware of it - I only figured this out a couple weeks ago.
    ------------------
    Scott
     
  9. Randy dela Fuente

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    Scott,
    Thanks for the tip on editing. I wasn't paying attention....
    Here's a link to the Duraspin:
    http://www.duraspin.com/index.html
    All you do is pull the trigger and push, it drives the screw and advances to the next one. I love this tool. It makes me want to build stuff!
    It was under $200 and the buckets of 1,000 screws are about 17-18 bucks. They come in all sorts of different lengths as well.
    I originally purchased the soundboard at a specialty drywall company in the Seattle area and then discovered Home Depot carries it. It is used exclusively for sound control. It's sort of like compressed chewed up cardboard and can be cut with a utility knife.
    ------------------
    Randy
    http://sportraits.com/ht
    website/theatrefs.html
     
  10. Scott-C

    Scott-C Supporting Actor

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    Wow, that Duraspin "toy" looks really cool! I may have to pick up one of those before I start my HT project. I can't imaging hand-screwing in all those screws.
    Also, thanks for the information on the sound board. In the end, all home improvement construction projects seem to come back to Home Depot, don't they? It's like some strange home improvement circle of life or something...
    Thanks!
    ------------------
    Scott
     
  11. Renny

    Renny Auditioning

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    Looks like a very tight/sound proof setup but how are you handling the air exchange. That room you created is so tight that it can be dangerous to your health if you do not have some sort of air exchange! Just wondered what you are doing about this.
     
  12. Cy Thomson

    Cy Thomson Auditioning

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    Outstanding work. Tell me more about the reseliant channel. What and were if possible.
    Thanks,
    Cy
     
  13. Randy dela Fuente

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    Renny,
    Good question. I do plan on running a fresh air intake through the equipment room, under the nook and out through a vent I'll build into the risers. I'm also planning on building a box under the nook with an ultra quiet fan to assist in getting air into the room.
    I'm curious what the dangers to my health would be of being in the room for a few hours a night (if I didn't do this), assuming I'd get up every once in a while and opened the door to get a drink and/or go to the bathroom. Also, the equipment rack room is equipped with a fan to remove the heat. Can you please explain a little further?
    The area under the nook will have access through the equipment room for any future improvements (most of my room wiring is accessible from the junction boxes in there and I also ran a separate 15 amp outlet for misc future non-a/v needs.
    I was able to work a little tonight and completed the columns and started laying out the risers. I'll try to post detail pictures of some areas of the theatre this week.
    ------------------
    Randy
    http://sportraits.com/htwebsite/theatrefs.html
     
  14. Randy dela Fuente

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    Cy,
    This isn't something you'll find at a Home Depot. Try looking in the yellow pages under drywall suppliers. The first time I purchased some, I also bought soundboard from the company. They were also very helpful in giving me tips on installation. Just let them know what you're trying to achieve and they should be able to help.
    ------------------
    Randy
    http://sportraits.com/htwebsite/theatrefs.html
     
  15. Renny

    Renny Auditioning

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    Randy,
    Basically, what you have created is a beautiful sound proof room that acts almost like a balloon. No air in or out. If you do not get fresh air into this room, it will be very unhealthy and dangerous for you. The body breathes in oxygen and release carbon dioxide as you probably know. The room you built is so tight that when you have everything closed up, you could be putting yourself in a dangerous situation. I'll bet that if you do not put an air exchange system in, you might feel very tired while you are in this room due to lack of oxygen. Sheetrock is a porous material so I don't think that room would ever get to the point where it would lockout all outside air but I do think it could get to the point where it would make you rather tired. Do you feel comfortable depriving the body of oxygen?? I certainly wouldn't take those risks to watch a movie.
    I see that you have plans for getting fresh air into the room. Don' forget that you have to build something to pull the air out of the room. You can't push fresh air in without removing the existing air in the room.
    Good luck. I hope that my ideas can help you out. Any questions, let me know...
    Renny
     
  16. Randy dela Fuente

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    Renny,
    I'm thinking that the vent fan for the rack should assist in pulling the air out of the thatre since the rack is not "tight". If I discover it to not be sufficient, I can always add another vent pretty easily.
    Does the air intake I have planned sound okay? (using a filtered fan box to bring air in)
    Thanks for the advice.
    ------------------
    Randy
    http://sportraits.com/htwebsite/theatrefs.html
     
  17. Craig Robertson

    Craig Robertson Supporting Actor

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    Looks great, Randy! I'm starting my basement project soon and will share this thread and your construction pics with my contractor (father in law [​IMG]). keep us posted.
    craig
     
  18. Shaun Pressley

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    Randy,
    You'll really want/need some air flow in that room. Home Theaters get really stuffy after all of the equipment has been running for a while and add in all of those hot bodies watching the movie. My room takes about 20 minutes before getting stuffy. After an hour, it becomes down-right uncomfortable. Then I take my lazy tail into the other room and turn down the thermostat/air conditioning and ahhhh... instant relief. What I neglected to do was add a thermostat in my HT to automatically handle the air. I learned my lesson, don't make the same mistake or worse. Get fresh air in there and have a way to remove the warm stuffy air. If you don't your favorite room in the house will quickly become the most uncomfortable.
    You will also want a warm air return close to the projector that can suck out a large volume of warm air.
    Remember, after you have completed the construction if your room doesn't have what it needs, it will cost you more $$ to redo it after the fact. [​IMG]
    Good luck.
    Shaun http://www.users.qwest.net/~shaunpressley
     
  19. Randy dela Fuente

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    Shaun,
    Thanks for the input. Here's what I've decided to do, let me know what you think:
    I'll run 6" ducts in for fresh air assisted by a fan and the same for the return. I'll install under them under the nook and run vents on opposite sides of the rear riser . The vents will be put in the wall in the equipment room. I also plan on installing 2-3" PVC down the middle for running playstation wires and any other cabling to the seating area.
    Also, the rack will have a vent fan directly at the top that exhausts out the exterior wall.
    Sound good?
    (after some thought today, I changed the riser layout and edited this post) in case anyone was sent the previous one.
    ------------------
    Randy
    http://sportraits.com/htwebsite/theatrefs.html
    [Edited last by Randy dela Fuente on August 29, 2001 at 02:11 PM]
    [Edited last by Randy dela Fuente on August 29, 2001 at 03:05 PM]
    [Edited last by Randy dela Fuente on August 29, 2001 at 08:39 PM]
     
  20. Renny

    Renny Auditioning

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    Randy,
    I think you have a good plan. I think your fresh air supply will be satifactory.
    I would install some sort of ceiling fan or another air circulating-type of fan in the main area of the room to keep the air moving, this way, the air will not get stale. This is optional but I think it would be a good idea. At the very least, run the wires so that you can put it in at a later date if think you think you need it. With a room as closed up as that, you want to keep the air moving in and out of that room a ceiling fan will get the job done.
     

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